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RECORD 1
TITLE
  Novel coronavirus COVID-19: an overview for emergency clinicians
AUTHOR NAMES
  Giwa A.;  Desai A.
SOURCE
  Emergency medicine practice (2020) 22:2 Supplement 2 (1-21). Date of Publication: 27 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  Prior to the global outbreak of SARS-CoV in 2003, HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43 were the only coronaviruses known to infect humans. Following the SARS outbreak, 5 additional coronaviruses have been discovered in humans, most recently the novel coronavirus COVID-19, believed to have originated in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. SARS-CoV and MERSCoV are particularly pathogenic in humans and are associated with high mortality. In this review, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of the recently discovered COVID-19 are reviewed, with a focus on best practices and the public health implications.

RECORD 2
TITLE
  COVID-19 pandemic: triage for intensive-care treatment under resource scarcity
AUTHOR NAMES
  Swiss Academy Of Medical Sciences
SOURCE
  Swiss medical weekly (2020) 150 (w20229). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.4414/smw.2020.20229

RECORD 3
TITLE
  All Feet On Deck-The Role of Podiatry During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Preventing hospitalizations in an overburdened healthcare system, reducing amputation and death in people with diabetes
AUTHOR NAMES
  Rogers L.C.;  Lavery L.A.;  Joseph W.S.;  Armstrong D.G.
SOURCE
  Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The COVID-19 pandemic is driving significant change in the healthcare system and disrupting the best practices for diabetic limb preservation, leaving large numbers of patients without care. Patients with diabetes and foot ulcers are at increased risk for infections, hospitalization, amputations, and death. Podiatric care is associated with fewer diabetes-related amputations, ER visits, hospitalizations, length-of-stay, and costs. But podiatrists must mobilize and adopt the new paradigm of shifts away from hospital care to community-based care. Implementing the proposed Pandemic Diabetic Foot Triage System, in-home visits, higher acuity office visits, telemedicine, and remote patient monitoring can help podiatrists manage patients while reducing the COVID-19 risk. The goal of podiatrists during the pandemic is to reduce the burden on the healthcare system by keeping diabetic foot and wound patients safe, functional, and at home.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.7547/20-051

RECORD 4
TITLE
  Mimics and chameleons of COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Nickel C.H.;  Bingisser R.
SOURCE
  Swiss medical weekly (2020) 150 (w20231). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.4414/smw.2020.20231

RECORD 5
TITLE
  Covid-19: How doctors and healthcare systems are tackling coronavirus worldwide
AUTHOR NAMES
  Tanne J.H.;  Hayasaki E.;  Zastrow M.;  Pulla P.;  Smith P.;  Rada A.G.
SOURCE
  The BMJ (2020) 368 Article Number: m1086. Date of Publication: 18 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1090

RECORD 6
TITLE
  Characteristics of COVID-19 infection in Beijing
AUTHOR NAMES
  Tian S.;  Hu N.;  Lou J.;  Chen K.;  Kang X.;  Xiang Z.;  Chen H.;  Wang D.;  Liu N.;  Liu D.;  Chen G.;  Zhang Y.;  Li D.;  Li J.;  Lian H.;  Niu S.;  Zhang L.;  Zhang J.
SOURCE
  Journal of Infection (2020) 80:4 (401-406). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: Since the first case of a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection pneumonia was detected in Wuhan, China, a series of confirmed cases of the COVID-19 were found in Beijing. We analyzed the data of 262 confirmed cases to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 in Beijing. Methods: We collected patients who were transferred by Beijing Emergency Medical Service to the designated hospitals. The information on demographic, epidemiological, clinical, laboratory test for the COVID-19 virus, diagnostic classification, cluster case and outcome were obtained. Furthermore we compared the characteristics between severe and common confirmed cases which including mild cases, no-pneumonia cases and asymptomatic cases, and we also compared the features between COVID-19 and 2003 SARS. Findings: By Feb 10, 2020, 262 patients were transferred from the hospitals across Beijing to the designated hospitals for special treatment of the COVID-19 infected by Beijing emergency medical service. Among of 262 patients, 46 (17.6%) were severe cases, 216 (82.4%) were common cases, which including 192 (73.3%) mild cases, 11(4.2%) non-pneumonia cases and 13 (5.0%) asymptomatic cases respectively. The median age of patients was 47.5 years old and 48.5% were male. 192 (73.3%) patients were residents of Beijing, 50 (26.0%) of which had been to Wuhan, 116 (60.4%) had close contact with confirmed cases, 21 (10.9%) had no contact history. The most common symptoms at the onset of illness were fever (82.1%), cough (45.8%), fatigue (26.3%), dyspnea (6.9%) and headache (6.5%). The median incubation period was 6.7 days, the interval time from between illness onset and seeing a doctor was 4.5 days. As of Feb 10, 17.2% patients have discharged and 81.7% patients remain in hospital in our study, the fatality of COVID-19 infection in Beijing was 0.9%. Interpretation: On the basis of this study, we provided the ratio of the COVID-19 infection on the severe cases to the mild, asymptomatic and non-pneumonia cases in Beijing. Population was generally susceptible, and with a relatively low fatality rate. The measures to prevent transmission was very successful at early stage, the next steps on the COVID-19 infection should be focused on early isolation of patients and quarantine for close contacts in families and communities in Beijing. Funding: Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission and Ministry of Science and Technology.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2020.02.018

RECORD 7
TITLE
  Cardiovascular Considerations for Patients, Health Care Workers, and Health Systems During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Driggin E.;  Madhavan M.V.;  Bikdeli B.;  Chuich T.;  Laracy J.;  Bondi-Zoccai G.;  Brown T.S.;  Nigoghossian C.;  Zidar D.A.;  Haythe J.;  Brodie D.;  Beckman J.A.;  Kirtane A.J.;  Stone G.W.;  Krumholz H.M.;  Parikh S.A.
SOURCE
  Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2020). Date of Publication: 18 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that has significant implications for the cardiovascular care of patients. First, those with COVID-19 and preexisting cardiovascular disease (CVD) have an increased risk of severe disease and death. Second, infection has been associated with multiple direct and indirect cardiovascular complications including acute myocardial injury, myocarditis, arrhythmias and venous thromboembolism. Third, therapies under investigation for COVID-19 may have cardiovascular side effects. Fourth, the response to COVID-19 can compromise the rapid triage of non-COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular conditions. Finally, the provision of cardiovascular care may place health care workers in a position of vulnerability as they become host or vectors of virus transmission. We hereby review the peer-reviewed and preprint literature pertaining to cardiovascular considerations related to COVID-19 and highlight gaps in knowledge that require further study pertinent to patients, health care workers, and health systems.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2020.03.031

RECORD 8
TITLE
  Stepping up infection control measures in ophthalmology during the novel coronavirus outbreak: an experience from Hong Kong
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lai T.H.T.;  Tang E.W.H.;  Chau S.K.Y.;  Fung K.S.C.;  Li K.K.W.
SOURCE
  Graefe’s Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Purpose: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has rapidly emerged as a global health threat. The purpose of this article is to share our local experience of stepping up infection control measures in ophthalmology to minimise COVID-19 infection of both healthcare workers and patients. Methods: Infection control measures implemented in our ophthalmology clinic are discussed. The measures are based on detailed risk assessment by both local ophthalmologists and infection control experts. Results: A three-level hierarchy of control measures was adopted. First, for administrative control, in order to lower patient attendance, text messages with an enquiry phone number were sent to patients to reschedule appointments or arrange drug refill. In order to minimise cross-infection of COVID-19, a triage system was set up to identify patients with fever, respiratory symptoms, acute conjunctivitis or recent travel to outbreak areas and to encourage these individuals to postpone their appointments for at least 14 days. Micro-aerosol generating procedures, such as non-contact tonometry and operations under general anaesthesia were avoided. Nasal endoscopy was avoided as it may provoke sneezing and cause generation of droplets. All elective clinical services were suspended. Infection control training was provided to all clinical staff. Second, for environmental control, to reduce droplet transmission of COVID-19, installation of protective shields on slit lamps, frequent disinfection of equipment, and provision of eye protection to staff were implemented. All staff were advised to measure their own body temperatures before work and promptly report any symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, vomiting or diarrhoea. Third, universal masking, hand hygiene, and appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) were promoted. Conclusion: We hope our initial experience in stepping up infection control measures for COVID-19 infection in ophthalmology can help ophthalmologists globally to prepare for the potential community outbreak or pandemic. In order to minimise transmission of COVID-19, ophthalmologists should work closely with local infection control teams to implement infection control measures that are appropriate for their own clinical settings.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00417-020-04641-8

RECORD 9
TITLE
  Maternal health care management during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen Y.;  Li Z.;  Zhang Y.-Y.;  Zhao W.-H.;  Yu Z.-Y.
SOURCE
  Journal of medical virology (2020). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel type of highly contagious pneumonia caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Despite the strong efforts taken to control the epidemic, hundreds of thousands of people were infected worldwide by Mar. 11th , and was characterized as a pandemic by World Health Organization. Pregnant women are more susceptible to the virus due to immune and anatomic alteration, though hospital visits may increase the chance of infection, the lack of medical care during pregnancy may do more harm. Hence, a well-managed system that allows pregnant women to access maternal health care with minimum exposure risk is desired during the outbreak. Here, we present the managing processes of three pregnant women that had a fever during hospitalization at gynecology or obstetrics department, then further summarize and demonstrate our maternal health care management strategies including antenatal care planning, patient triage based on risk level, admission control, and measures counteracting emergencies and newly discovered high risk cases at in-patient department. In the meantime, we will explain the alterations we have done throughout different stages of the epidemic, and also review relative articles in both Chinese and English to compare our strategies with those of other areas. Although tens of COVID-19 cases were confirmed in our hospital, no nosocomial infection has occurred and none of the pregnant woman registered in our hospital was reported to be infected. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25787

RECORD 10
TITLE
  Will COVID-19 generate global preparedness?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Jacobsen K.H.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10229 (1013-1014). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30559-6

RECORD 11
TITLE
  Pathways for urology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Simonato A.;  Giannarini G.;  Abrate A.;  Bartoletti R.;  Crestani A.;  De Nunzio C.;  Gregori A.;  Liguori G.;  Novara G.;  Pavan N.;  Trombetta C.;  Tubaro A.;  Porpiglia F.;  Ficarra V.
SOURCE
  Minerva urologica e nefrologica = The Italian journal of urology and nephrology (2020). Date of Publication: 30 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The public health emergency caused by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in a significant reallocation of health resources with a consequent reorganization of the clinical activities also in several urological centers. A panel of Italian urologists has agreed on a set of recommendations on pathways of pre-, intra- and post-operative care for urological patients undergoing urgent procedures or non-deferrable oncological interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Simplification of the diagnostic and staging pathway has to be prioritized in order to reduce hospital visits and consequently the risk of contagion. In absence of strict uniform regulations that impose the implementation of nasopharyngeal swabs, we recommend that an accurate triage for possible COVID-19 symptoms be performed both by telephone at home before hospitalization and at the time of hospitalization. We recommend that during hospital stay patients should be provided with as many instructions as possible to facilitate their return to, and stay at, home. Patients should be discharged under stable good conditions in order to minimize the risk of readmission. It is advisable to reduce or reschedule post-discharge controls and implement an adequate system of communication for telemonitoring discharged patients in order to reduce hospital visits.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0393-2249.20.03861-8

RECORD 12
TITLE
  Adoption of COVID-19 triage strategies for low-income settings
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ayebare R.R.;  Flick R.;  Okware S.;  Bodo B.;  Lamorde M.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Respiratory Medicine (2020) 8:4 (e22). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(20)30114-4

RECORD 13
TITLE
  The response of Milan’s Emergency Medical System to the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy
AUTHOR NAMES
  Spina S.;  Marrazzo F.;  Migliari M.;  Stucchi R.;  Sforza A.;  Fumagalli R.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10227 (e49-e50). Date of Publication: 14 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30493-1

RECORD 14
TITLE
  Health security capacities in the context of COVID-19 outbreak: an analysis of International Health Regulations annual report data from 182 countries
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kandel N.;  Chungong S.;  Omaar A.;  Xing J.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10229 (1047-1053). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: Public health measures to prevent, detect, and respond to events are essential to control public health risks, including infectious disease outbreaks, as highlighted in the International Health Regulations (IHR). In light of the outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), we aimed to review existing health security capacities against public health risks and events. Methods: We used 18 indicators from the IHR State Party Annual Reporting (SPAR) tool and associated data from national SPAR reports to develop five indices: (1) prevent, (2) detect, (3) respond, (4) enabling function, and (5) operational readiness. We used SPAR 2018 data for all of the indicators and categorised countries into five levels across the indices, in which level 1 indicated the lowest level of national capacity and level 5 the highest. We also analysed data at the regional level (using the six geographical WHO regions). Findings: Of 182 countries, 52 (28%) had prevent capacities at levels 1 or 2, and 60 (33%) had response capacities at levels 1 or 2. 81 (45%) countries had prevent capacities and 78 (43%) had response capacities at levels 4 or 5, indicating that these countries were operationally ready. 138 (76%) countries scored more highly in the detect index than in the other indices. 44 (24%) countries did not have an effective enabling function for public health risks and events, including infectious disease outbreaks (7 [4%] at level 1 and 37 [20%] at level 2). 102 (56%) countries had level 4 or level 5 enabling function capacities in place. 32 (18%) countries had low readiness (2 [1%] at level 1 and 30 [17%] at level 2), and 104 (57%) countries were operationally ready to prevent, detect, and control an outbreak of a novel infectious disease (66 [36%] at level 4 and 38 [21%] at level 5). Interpretation: Countries vary widely in terms of their capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to outbreaks. Half of all countries analysed have strong operational readiness capacities in place, which suggests that an effective response to potential health emergencies could be enabled, including to COVID-19. Findings from local risk assessments are needed to fully understand national readiness capacities in relation to COVID-19. Capacity building and collaboration between countries are needed to strengthen global readiness for outbreak control. Funding: None.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30553-5

RECORD 15
TITLE
  Familial cluster of COVID-19 infection from an asymptomatic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhang J.;  Tian S.;  Lou J.;  Chen Y.
SOURCE
  Critical Care (2020) 24:1 Article Number: 119. Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13054-020-2817-7

RECORD 16
TITLE
  Novel Screening and Triage Strategy in Iran During Deadly COVID-19 Epidemic; Value of Humanitarian Teleconsultation Service
AUTHOR NAMES
  Davarpanah A.H.;  Mahdavi A.;  Sabri A.;  Langroudi T.F.;  Kahkouee S.;  Haseli S.;  Kazemi M.A.;  Mehrian P.;  Mahdavi A.;  Falahati F.;  Tuchayi A.M.;  Bakhshayeshkaram M.;  Taheri M.S.
SOURCE
  Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR (2020). Date of Publication: 20 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2020.03.015

RECORD 17
TITLE
  2019-nCoV: The Identify-Isolate-Inform (3I) Tool Applied to a Novel Emerging Coronavirus
AUTHOR NAMES
  Koenig K.L.;  Beÿ C.K.;  McDonald E.C.
SOURCE
  The western journal of emergency medicine (2020) 21:2 (184-190). Date of Publication: 31 Jan 2020
ABSTRACT
  2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is an emerging infectious disease closely related to MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV that was first reported in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. As of January 2020, cases of 2019-nCoV are continuing to be reported in other Eastern Asian countries as well as in the United States, Europe, Australia, and numerous other countries. An unusually high volume of domestic and international travel corresponding to the beginning of the 2020 Chinese New Year complicated initial identification and containment of infected persons. Due to the rapidly rising number of cases and reported deaths, all countries should be considered at risk of imported 2019-nCoV. Therefore, it is essential for prehospital, clinic, and emergency department personnel to be able to rapidly assess 2019-nCoV risk and take immediate actions if indicated. The Identify-Isolate-Inform (3I) Tool, originally conceived for the initial detection and management of Ebola virus and later adjusted for other infectious agents, can be adapted for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I Tool for use in the initial detection and management of patients under investigation for 2019-nCoV. After initial assessment for symptoms and epidemiological risk factors, including travel to affected areas and exposure to confirmed 2019-nCoV patients within 14 days, patients are classified in a risk-stratified system. Upon confirmation of a suspected 2019-nCoV case, affected persons must immediately be placed in airborne infection isolation and the appropriate public health agencies notified. This modified 3I Tool will assist emergency and primary care clinicians, as well as out-of-hospital providers, in effectively managing persons with suspected or confirmed 2019-nCoV.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.5811/westjem.2020.1.46760