Pediatrics

Latest from Embase

Latest from Pubmed

List of Articles

RECORD 1
TITLE
  Review article: gastrointestinal features in COVID-19 and the possibility of faecal transmission
AUTHOR NAMES
  Tian Y.;  Rong L.;  Nian W.;  He Y.
SOURCE
  Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: There is little published evidence on the gastrointestinal features of COVID-19. Aims: To report on the gastrointestinal manifestations and pathological findings of patients with COVID-19, and to discuss the possibility of faecal transmission. Methods: We have reviewed gastrointestinal features of, and faecal test results in, COVID-19 from case reports and retrospective clinical studies relating to the digestive system published since the outbreak. Results: With an incidence of 3% (1/41)-79% (159/201), gastrointestinal symptoms of COVID-19 included anorexia 39.9% (55/138)-50.2% (101/201), diarrhoea 2% (2/99)-49.5% (146/295), vomiting 3.6% (5/138)-66.7% (4/6), nausea 1% (1/99)-29.4% (59/201), abdominal pain 2.2% (3/138)-6.0% (12/201) and gastrointestinal bleeding 4% (2/52)-13.7% (10/73). Diarrhoea was the most common gastrointestinal symptom in children and adults, with a mean duration of 4.1 ± 2.5 days, and was observed before and after diagnosis. Vomiting was more prominent in children. About 3.6% (5/138)-15.9% (32/201) of adult and 6.5% (2/31)-66.7% (4/6) of children patients presented vomiting. Adult and children patients can present with digestive symptoms in the absence of respiratory symptoms. The incidence of digestive manifestations was higher in the later than in the early stage of the epidemic, but no differences in digestive symptoms among different regions were found. Among the group of patients with a higher proportion of severe cases, the proportion of gastrointestinal symptoms in severe patients was higher than that in nonsevere patients (anorexia 66.7% vs 30.4%; abdominal pain 8.3% vs 0%); while in the group of patients with a lower severe rate, the proportion with gastrointestinal symptoms was similar in severe and nonsevere cases (nausea and vomiting 6.9% vs 4.6%; diarrhoea 5.8% vs 3.5%). Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and virus nucleocapsid protein were detected in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, and infectious virus particles were isolated from faeces. Faecal PCR testing was as accurate as respiratory specimen PCR detection. In 36% (5/14)-53% (39/73) faecal PCR became positive, 2-5 days later than sputum PCR positive. Faecal excretion persisted after sputum excretion in 23% (17/73)-82% (54/66) patients for 1-11 days. Conclusions: Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in patients with COVID-19, and had an increased prevalence in the later stage of the recent epidemic in China. SARS-CoV-2 enters gastrointestinal epithelial cells, and the faeces of COVID-19 patients are potentially infectious.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apt.15731

RECORD 2
TITLE
  2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak: A new challenge
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lupia T.;  Scabini S.;  Mornese Pinna S.;  Di Perri G.;  De Rosa F.G.;  Corcione S.
SOURCE
  Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance (2020) 21 (22-27). Date of Publication: 1 Jun 2020
ABSTRACT
  Objectives: Following the public-health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 30 January 2020 and the recent outbreak caused by 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) [officially renamed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] in China and 29 other countries, we aimed to summarise the clinical aspects of the novelBetacoronavirus disease (COVID-19) and its possible clinical presentations together with suggested therapeutic algorithms for patients who may require antimicrobial treatment. Methods: The currently available literature was reviewed for microbiologically confirmed infections by 2019-nCoV or COVID-19 at the time of writing (13 February 2020). A literature search was performed using the PubMed database and Cochrane Library. Search terms included ‘novel coronavirus’ or ‘2019-nCoV’ or ‘COVID-19’. Results: Published cases occurred mostly in males (age range, 8–92 years). Cardiovascular, digestive and endocrine system diseases were commonly reported, except previous chronic pulmonary diseases [e.g. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis] that were surprisingly underreported. Fever was present in all of the case series available, flanked by cough, dyspnoea, myalgia and fatigue. Multiple bilateral lobular and subsegmental areas of consolidation or bilateral ground-glass opacities were the main reported radiological features of 2019-nCoV infection, at least in the early phases of the disease. Conclusion: The new 2019-nCoV epidemic is mainly associated with respiratory disease and few extrapulmonary signs. However, there is a low rate of associated pre-existing respiratory co-morbidities.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jgar.2020.02.021

RECORD 3
TITLE
  The psychological impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on college students in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cao W.;  Fang Z.;  Hou G.;  Han M.;  Xu X.;  Dong J.;  Zheng J.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry Research (2020) 287 Article Number: 112934. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  A COVID-19 epidemic has been spreading in China and other parts of the world since December 2019. The epidemic has brought not only the risk of death from infection but also unbearable psychological pressure. We sampled college students from Changzhi medical college by using cluster sampling. They responded to a questionnaire packet that included the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and those inquiring the participants’ basic information. We received 7,143 responses. Results indicated that 0.9% of the respondents were experiencing severe anxiety, 2.7% moderate anxiety, and 21.3% mild anxiety. Moreover, living in urban areas (OR = 0.810, 95% CI = 0.709 – 0.925), family income stability (OR = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.645 – 0.817) and living with parents (OR = 0.752, 95% CI = 0.596 – 0.950) were protective factors against anxiety. Moreover, having relatives or acquaintances infected with COVID-19 was a risk factor for increasing the anxiety of college students (OR = 3.007, 95% CI = 2.377 – 3.804). Results of correlation analysis indicated that economic effects, and effects on daily life, as well as delays in academic activities, were positively associated with anxiety symptoms (P <.001). However, social support was negatively correlated with the level of anxiety (P <.001). It is suggested that the mental health of college students should be monitored during epidemics.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112934

RECORD 4
TITLE
  Routine childhood immunization may protect against COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Salman S.;  Salem M.L.
SOURCE
  Medical Hypotheses (2020) 140 Article Number: 109689. Date of Publication: 1 Jul 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2020.109689

RECORD 5
TITLE
  Severe Outcomes Among Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) – United States, February 12-March 16, 2020
SOURCE
  MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report (2020) 69:12 (343-346). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Globally, approximately 170,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) have been reported, including an estimated 7,000 deaths in approximately 150 countries (1). On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic (2). Data from China have indicated that older adults, particularly those with serious underlying health conditions, are at higher risk for severe COVID-19-associated illness and death than are younger persons (3). Although the majority of reported COVID-19 cases in China were mild (81%), approximately 80% of deaths occurred among adults aged ≥60 years; only one (0.1%) death occurred in a person aged ≤19 years (3). In this report, COVID-19 cases in the United States that occurred during February 12-March 16, 2020 and severity of disease (hospitalization, admission to intensive care unit [ICU], and death) were analyzed by age group. As of March 16, a total of 4,226 COVID-19 cases in the United States had been reported to CDC, with multiple cases reported among older adults living in long-term care facilities (4). Overall, 31% of cases, 45% of hospitalizations, 53% of ICU admissions, and 80% of deaths associated with COVID-19 were among adults aged ≥65 years with the highest percentage of severe outcomes among persons aged ≥85 years. In contrast, no ICU admissions or deaths were reported among persons aged ≤19 years. Similar to reports from other countries, this finding suggests that the risk for serious disease and death from COVID-19 is higher in older age groups.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6912e2

RECORD 6
TITLE
  Covid-19 risks and response in South Asia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Bhutta Z.A.;  Basnyat B.;  Saha S.;  Laxminarayan R.
SOURCE
  The BMJ (2020) 368 Article Number: m1190. Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1190

RECORD 7
TITLE
  COVID-19: Pandemic Contingency Planning for the Allergy and Immunology Clinic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Shaker M.S.;  Oppenheimer J.;  Grayson M.;  Stukus D.;  Hartog N.;  Hsieh E.W.Y.;  Rider N.;  Dutmer C.M.;  Vander Leek T.K.;  Kim H.;  Chan E.S.;  Mack D.;  Ellis A.K.;  Lang D.;  Lieberman J.;  Fleischer D.;  Golden D.B.K.;  Wallace D.;  Portnoy J.;  Mosnaim G.;  Greenhawt M.
SOURCE
  The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice (2020). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  In the event of a global infectious pandemic, drastic measures may be needed that limit or require adjustment of ambulatory allergy services. However, no rationale for how to prioritize service shut down and patient care exists. A consensus-based ad-hoc expert panel of allergy/immunology specialists from the United States and Canada developed a service and patient prioritization schematic to temporarily triage allergy/immunology services. Recommendations and feedback were developed iteratively, using an adapted modified Delphi methodology to achieve consensus. During the ongoing pandemic while social distancing is being encouraged, most allergy/immunology care could be postponed/delayed or handled through virtual care. With the exception of many patients with primary immunodeficiency, patients on venom immunotherapy, and patients with asthma of a certain severity, there is limited need for face-to-face visits under such conditions. These suggestions are intended to help provide a logical approach to quickly adjust service to mitigate risk to both medical staff and patients. Importantly, individual community circumstances may be unique and require contextual consideration. The decision to enact any of these measures rests with the judgment of each clinician and individual health care system. Pandemics are unanticipated, and enforced social distancing/quarantining is highly unusual. This expert panel consensus document offers a prioritization rational to help guide decision making when such situations arise and an allergist/immunologist is forced to reduce services or makes the decision on his or her own to do so.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.03.012

RECORD 8
TITLE
  Proposal for international standardization of the use of lung ultrasound for COVID-19 patients; a simple, quantitative, reproducible method
AUTHOR NAMES
  Soldati G.;  Smargiassi A.;  Inchingolo R.;  Buonsenso D.;  Perrone T.;  Briganti D.F.;  Perlini S.;  Torri E.;  Mariani A.;  Mossolani E.E.;  Tursi F.;  Mento F.;  Demi L.
SOURCE
  Journal of ultrasound in medicine : official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 30 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Growing evidences are showing the usefulness of lung ultrasound in patients with COVID-19. Sars-CoV-2 has now spread in almost every country in the world. In this study, we share our experience and propose a standardized approach in order to optimize the use of lung ultrasound in covid-19 patients. We focus on equipment, procedure, classification and data-sharing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jum.15285

RECORD 9
TITLE
  International Perspectives Concerning Donor Milk Banking During the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Marinelli K.A.
SOURCE
  Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association (2020) (890334420917661). Date of Publication: 30 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0890334420917661

RECORD 10
TITLE
  Convalescent plasma as a potential therapy for COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen L.;  Xiong J.;  Bao L.;  Shi Y.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Infectious Diseases (2020) 20:4 (398-400). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30141-9

RECORD 11
TITLE
  COVID-19 in the Pediatric Population
AUTHOR NAMES
  Abdelmaksoud A.;  Kroumpouzos G.;  Jafferany M.;  Lotti T.;  Sadoughifar R.;  Goldust M.
SOURCE
  Dermatologic therapy (2020) (e13339). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13339

RECORD 12
TITLE
  A quickly, effectively screening process of novel corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children in Shanghai, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Shi Y.;  Wang X.;  Liu G.;  Zhu Q.;  Wang J.;  Yu H.;  Wang C.;  Wang L.;  Zhang M.;  Zhang L.;  Lu G.;  Lu Z.;  Yu J.;  Qiao Z.;  Gu Y.;  Shen G.;  Xu H.;  Zeng M.;  Zhai X.;  Huang G.
SOURCE
  Annals of Translational Medicine (2020) 8:5 Article Number: 241. Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: A recent cluster of pneumonia cases in China was caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We report the screening and diagnosis of corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in our hospital. Methods: Developed a procedure for the identification of children cases with COVID-19 in outpatient and emergency department of our hospital, then we observed how this process works. Results: (I) There were 56 cases considered suspected cases, and 10 cases were confirmed as COVID-19. (II) Of the 10 confirmed COVID-19 cases admitted in our hospital, 5 were males and 5 were females, aged from 7 months to 11 years, the average age is 6.0±4.2 years, 6 cases were mild pneumonia, the others were upper respiratory tract infection. (III) We followed up 68 patients in isolation at home until symptoms disappeared. Non were missed in the patient’s first visit. The sensitivity of this method is 100% and the specificity is 71.3%. Conclusions: Our screening process works well, and it is also necessary to establish a screening network in the hospital.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/atm.2020.03.22

RECORD 13
TITLE
  The human rights of children with disabilities during health emergencies: the challenge of COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Schiariti V.
SOURCE
  Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14526

RECORD 14
TITLE
  Point-of-care RNA-based diagnostic device for Covid-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yang T.;  Wang Y.-C.;  Shen C.-F.;  Cheng C.-M.
SOURCE
  Diagnostics (2020) 10:3 Article Number: 165. Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10030165

RECORD 15
TITLE
  Prisons and custodial settings are part of a comprehensive response to COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kinner S.A.;  Young J.T.;  Snow K.;  Southalan L.;  Lopez-Acuña D.;  Ferreira-Borges C.;  O’Moore É.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Public Health (2020) 5:4 (e188-e189). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30058-X

RECORD 16
TITLE
  High-resolution computed tomography manifestations of COVID-19 infections in patients of different ages
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen Z.;  Fan H.;  Cai J.;  Li Y.;  Wu B.;  Hou Y.;  Xu S.;  Zhou F.;  Liu Y.;  Xuan W.;  Hu H.;  Sun J.
SOURCE
  European Journal of Radiology (2020) 126 Article Number: 108972. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  Purpose: We aimed to compare chest HRCT lung signs identified in scans of differently aged patients with COVID-19 infections. Methods: Case data of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 infection in Hangzhou City, Zhejiang Province in China were collected, and chest HRCT signs of infected patients in four age groups (<18 years, 18–44 years, 45–59 years, ≥60 years) were compared. Results: Small patchy, ground-glass opacity (GGO), and consolidations were the main HRCT signs in 98 patients with confirmed COVID-19 infections. Patients aged 45–59 years and aged ≥60 years had more bilateral lung, lung lobe, and lung field involvement, and greater lesion numbers than patients <18 years. GGO accompanied with the interlobular septa thickening or a crazy-paving pattern, consolidation, and air bronchogram sign were more common in patients aged 45–59 years, and ≥60 years, than in those aged <18 years, and aged 18–44 years. Conclusions: Chest HRCT manifestations in patients with COVID-19 are related to patient’s age, and HRCT signs may be milder in younger patients.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2020.108972

RECORD 17
TITLE
  Early in the epidemic: impact of preprints on global discourse about COVID-19 transmissibility
AUTHOR NAMES
  Majumder M.S.;  Mandl K.D.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Global health (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30113-3

RECORD 18
TITLE
  Clinical and coagulation characteristics of 7 patients with critical COVID-2019 pneumonia and acro-ischemia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhang Y.;  Cao W.;  Xiao M.;  Li Y.J.;  Yang Y.;  Zhao J.;  Zhou X.;  Jiang W.;  Zhao Y.Q.;  Zhang S.Y.;  Li T.S.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua xue ye xue za zhi = Zhonghua xueyexue zazhi (2020) 41 (E006). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Objective: To investigate the clinical and coagulation characteristics of the critical Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with acro-ischemia in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: The retrospective study included 7 critical COVID-19 patients with acro-ischemia in a single center in Wuhan, from Feb 4 to Feb 15, 2020. The clinical and laboratory data before and during the ICU stay were analyzed. Results: The median age of 7 patients was 59 years and 4 of them were men. 3 of them were associated with underlying comorbidities. Fever, cough, dyspnea and diarrhea were common clinical symptoms. All patients had acro-ischemia presentations including finger/toe cyanosis, skin bulla and dry gangrene. D-dimer, fibrinogen and fibrinogen degradation product (FDP) were significantly elevated in most patients. Prothrombin time (PT) were prolonged in 4 patients. D-dimer and FDP levels increased progressively when COVID-2019 exacerbated, and 4 patients were diagnosed with definite disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). 6 patients received low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treatment, after which their D-dimer and FDP decreased, but there was no significant improvement in clinical symptoms. 5 patients died finally and the median time from acro-ischemia to death was 12 days. Conclusions: The existence of hypercoagulation status in critical COVID-2019 patients should be monitored closely, and anticoagulation therapy can be considered in selected patients. More clinical data is needed to investigate the role of anticoagulation in COVID-2019 treatment.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0253-2727.2020.0006

RECORD 19
TITLE
  The effect of control strategies to reduce social mixing on outcomes of the COVID-19 epidemic in Wuhan, China: a modelling study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Prem K.;  Liu Y.;  Russell T.W.;  Kucharski A.J.;  Eggo R.M.;  Davies N.;  Jit M.;  Klepac P.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Public health (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: In December, 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel coronavirus, emerged in Wuhan, China. Since then, the city of Wuhan has taken unprecedented measures in response to the outbreak, including extended school and workplace closures. We aimed to estimate the effects of physical distancing measures on the progression of the COVID-19 epidemic, hoping to provide some insights for the rest of the world. METHODS: To examine how changes in population mixing have affected outbreak progression in Wuhan, we used synthetic location-specific contact patterns in Wuhan and adapted these in the presence of school closures, extended workplace closures, and a reduction in mixing in the general community. Using these matrices and the latest estimates of the epidemiological parameters of the Wuhan outbreak, we simulated the ongoing trajectory of an outbreak in Wuhan using an age-structured susceptible-exposed-infected-removed (SEIR) model for several physical distancing measures. We fitted the latest estimates of epidemic parameters from a transmission model to data on local and internationally exported cases from Wuhan in an age-structured epidemic framework and investigated the age distribution of cases. We also simulated lifting of the control measures by allowing people to return to work in a phased-in way and looked at the effects of returning to work at different stages of the underlying outbreak (at the beginning of March or April). FINDINGS: Our projections show that physical distancing measures were most effective if the staggered return to work was at the beginning of April; this reduced the median number of infections by more than 92% (IQR 66-97) and 24% (13-90) in mid-2020 and end-2020, respectively. There are benefits to sustaining these measures until April in terms of delaying and reducing the height of the peak, median epidemic size at end-2020, and affording health-care systems more time to expand and respond. However, the modelled effects of physical distancing measures vary by the duration of infectiousness and the role school children have in the epidemic. INTERPRETATION: Restrictions on activities in Wuhan, if maintained until April, would probably help to delay the epidemic peak. Our projections suggest that premature and sudden lifting of interventions could lead to an earlier secondary peak, which could be flattened by relaxing the interventions gradually. However, there are limitations to our analysis, including large uncertainties around estimates of R0 and the duration of infectiousness. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust, and Health Data Research UK.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30073-6

RECORD 20
TITLE
  Clinical and epidemiological features of 36 children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Zhejiang, China: an observational cohort study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Qiu H.;  Wu J.;  Hong L.;  Luo Y.;  Song Q.;  Chen D.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Infectious diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: Since December, 2019, an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread globally. Little is known about the epidemiological and clinical features of paediatric patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively retrieved data for paediatric patients (aged 0-16 years) with confirmed COVID-19 from electronic medical records in three hospitals in Zhejiang, China. We recorded patients’ epidemiological and clinical features. FINDINGS: From Jan 17 to March 1, 2020, 36 children (mean age 8·3 [SD 3·5] years) were identified to be infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The route of transmission was by close contact with family members (32 [89%]) or a history of exposure to the epidemic area (12 [33%]); eight (22%) patients had both exposures. 19 (53%) patients had moderate clinical type with pneumonia; 17 (47%) had mild clinical type and either were asymptomatic (ten [28%]) or had acute upper respiratory symptoms (seven [19%]). Common symptoms on admission were fever (13 [36%]) and dry cough (seven [19%]). Of those with fever, four (11%) had a body temperature of 38·5°C or higher, and nine (25%) had a body temperature of 37·5-38·5°C. Typical abnormal laboratory findings were elevated creatine kinase MB (11 [31%]), decreased lymphocytes (11 [31%]), leucopenia (seven [19%]), and elevated procalcitonin (six [17%]). Besides radiographic presentations, variables that were associated significantly with severity of COVID-19 were decreased lymphocytes, elevated body temperature, and high levels of procalcitonin, D-dimer, and creatine kinase MB. All children received interferon alfa by aerosolisation twice a day, 14 (39%) received lopinavir-ritonavir syrup twice a day, and six (17%) needed oxygen inhalation. Mean time in hospital was 14 (SD 3) days. By Feb 28, 2020, all patients were cured. INTERPRETATION: Although all paediatric patients in our cohort had mild or moderate type of COVID-19, the large proportion of asymptomatic children indicates the difficulty in identifying paediatric patients who do not have clear epidemiological information, leading to a dangerous situation in community-acquired infections. FUNDING: Ningbo Clinical Research Center for Children’s Health and Diseases, Ningbo Reproductive Medicine Centre, and Key Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects of Wenzhou.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30198-5

RECORD 21
TITLE
  COVID-19 in children: the link in the transmission chain
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kelvin A.A.;  Halperin S.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Infectious diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30236-X

RECORD 22
TITLE
  Challenges posed by COVID-19 to children with cancer
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kotecha R.S.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Oncology (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30205-9

RECORD 23
TITLE
  Parenting in a time of COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cluver L.;  Lachman J.M.;  Sherr L.;  Wessels I.;  Krug E.;  Rakotomalala S.;  Blight S.;  Hillis S.;  Bachman G.;  Green O.;  Butchart A.;  Tomlinson M.;  Ward C.L.;  Doubt J.;  McDonald K.
SOURCE
  Lancet (London, England) (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30736-4

RECORD 24
TITLE
  Sound Science before Quick Judgement Regarding RAS Blockade in COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sparks M.A.;  South A.;  Welling P.;  Luther J.M.;  Cohen J.;  Byrd J.B.;  Burrell L.M.;  Batlle D.;  Tomlinson L.;  Bhalla V.;  Rheault M.N.;  Soler M.J.;  Swaminathan S.;  Hiremath S.
SOURCE
  Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN (2020). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.2215/CJN.03530320

RECORD 25
TITLE
  European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) statement on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2)-infection and atopic dermatitis
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wollenberg A.;  Flohr C.;  Simon D.;  Cork M.J.;  Thyssen J.P.;  Bieber T.;  de Bruin-Weller M.S.;  Weidinger S.;  Deleuran M.;  Taieb A.;  Paul C.;  Trzeciak M.;  Werfel T.;  Seneschal J.;  Barbarot S.;  Darsow U.;  Torrelo A.;  Stalder J.-F.;  Svensson Å.;  Hijnen D.;  Gelmetti C.;  Szalai Z.;  Gieler U.;  De Raeve L.;  Kunz B.;  Spuls P.;  von Kobyletzki L.B.;  Fölster-Holst R.;  Chernyshov P.V.;  Cristen-Zaech S.;  Heratizadeh A.;  Ring J.;  Vestergaard C.
SOURCE
  Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV (2020). Date of Publication: 29 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex disease with elevated risk of respiratory comorbidities.1,2 Severely affected patients are often treated with immune-modulating systemic drugs.3,4 On March 11th 2020, the World Health Organization declared the 2019 novel coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-Cov-2) epidemic to be a pandemic. The number of cases worldwide is increasing exponentially and poses a major health threat, especially for those who are elderly, immuno-compromised, or have comorbidities. This also applies to AD patients on systemic immune-modulating treatment. In these days of uncertainty, reallocation of medical resources, curfew, hoarding, and shutdown of normal social life, patients, caregivers and doctors ask questions regarding the continuation of systemic immune-modulating treatment of AD patients. The ETFAD decided to address some of these questions here.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jdv.16411

RECORD 26
TITLE
  Detectable SARS-CoV-2 Viral RNA in Feces of Three Children during Recovery Period of COVID-19 Pneumonia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhang T.;  Cui X.;  Zhao X.;  Wang J.;  Zheng J.;  Zheng G.;  Guo W.;  Cai C.;  He S.;  Xu Y.
SOURCE
  Journal of medical virology (2020). Date of Publication: 29 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a newly emerging infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). After its first occurrence in Wuhan of China from December 2019, COVID-19 rapidly spread around the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) statement on March 13, 2020, there had been over 132,500 confirmed cases globally. Nevertheless, the case reports of children are rare, which result in the lack of evidence for preventing and controlling of children’s infection. Here, we report 3 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infected children diagnosed from February 3 to February 17, 2020 in Tianjin, China. All of these three cases experienced mild illness and recovered soon after treatment, with the nucleic acid of throat swab turning negative within 14, 11, 7 days after diagnosis respectively. However, after been discharged, all the three cases were tested SARS-CoV-2 positive in the stool samples within 10 days, in spite of their remained negative nucleic acid in throat swab specimens. Therefore, it is necessary to be aware of the possibility of fecal-oral transmission of SARS-CoV-2 infection, especially for children cases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25795

RECORD 27
TITLE
  Clinical analysis of pregnant women with 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen S.;  Liao E.;  Shao Y.
SOURCE
  Journal of medical virology (2020). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the pregnant women infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and provide help for clinical prevention and treatment. METHODS: All 5 cases of pregnant women confirmed COVID-19 were collected among patients who admitted in Maternal and Child Hospital of Hubei Province between January 20 and February 10, 2020. RESULTS: All patients, aging from 25 to 31 years old, had the gestational week from 38th weeks to 41st weeks. All pregnant women did not have an antepartum fever but developed a low-grade fever (37.5-38.5℃) within 24 hours after delivery. All patients had normal liver and renal function, two patients had elevated plasma levels of the myocardial enzyme. Unusual chest imaging manifestations, featured with ground-grass opacity, were frequently observed in bilateral (3 cases) or unilateral lobe (2 cases) by computed tomography (CT) scan. All labors smoothly processed, the Apgar scores were 10 one and five minutes after delivery, no complications were observed in the newborn. INTERPRETATION: Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of patients with COVID-19 should receive more attention. It is probable that pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 have no fever before delivery. Their primary initial manifestations were merely low-grade postpartum fever or mild respiratory symptoms. Therefore, the protective measures are necessary on admission; the instant CT scan and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay should be helpful in early diagnosis and avoid cross-infection on the occasion that patients have fever and other respiratory signs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25789

RECORD 28
TITLE
  Spotlight on Jails: COVID-19 Mitigation Policies Needed Now
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wurcel A.G.;  Dauria E.;  Zaller N.;  Nijhawan A.;  Beckwith C.;  Nowotny K.;  Brinkley-Rubinstein L.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa346

RECORD 29
TITLE
  COVID-19 Global Pandemic: Options for Management of Gynecologic Cancers
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ramirez P.T.;  Chiva L.;  Eriksson A.G.Z.;  Frumovitz M.;  Fagotti A.;  Gonzalez Martin A.;  Jhingran A.;  Pareja R.
SOURCE
  International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society (2020). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ijgc-2020-001419

RECORD 30
TITLE
  A Review of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Singhal T.
SOURCE
  Indian Journal of Pediatrics (2020) 87:4 (281-286). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
ABSTRACT
  There is a new public health crises threatening the world with the emergence and spread of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) or the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The virus originated in bats and was transmitted to humans through yet unknown intermediary animals in Wuhan, Hubei province, China in December 2019. There have been around 96,000 reported cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-2019) and 3300 reported deaths to date (05/03/2020). The disease is transmitted by inhalation or contact with infected droplets and the incubation period ranges from 2 to 14 d. The symptoms are usually fever, cough, sore throat, breathlessness, fatigue, malaise among others. The disease is mild in most people; in some (usually the elderly and those with comorbidities), it may progress to pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multi organ dysfunction. Many people are asymptomatic. The case fatality rate is estimated to range from 2 to 3%. Diagnosis is by demonstration of the virus in respiratory secretions by special molecular tests. Common laboratory findings include normal/ low white cell counts with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). The computerized tomographic chest scan is usually abnormal even in those with no symptoms or mild disease. Treatment is essentially supportive; role of antiviral agents is yet to be established. Prevention entails home isolation of suspected cases and those with mild illnesses and strict infection control measures at hospitals that include contact and droplet precautions. The virus spreads faster than its two ancestors the SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), but has lower fatality. The global impact of this new epidemic is yet uncertain.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-020-03263-6

RECORD 31
TITLE
  Lower mortality of COVID-19 by early recognition and intervention: experience from Jiangsu Province
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sun Q.;  Qiu H.;  Huang M.;  Yang Y.
SOURCE
  Annals of Intensive Care (2020) 10:1 Article Number: 33. Date of Publication: 1 Dec 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13613-020-00650-2

RECORD 32
TITLE
  Anal swab findings in an infant with COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Fan Q.;  Pan Y.;  Wu Q.;  Liu S.;  Song X.;  Xie Z.;  Liu Y.;  Zhao L.;  Wang Z.;  Zhang Y.;  Wu Z.;  Guan L.;  Lv X.
SOURCE
  Pediatric Investigation (2020) 4:1 (48-50). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Introduction: The transmission pathways of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain not completely clear. In this case study the test for the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in pharyngeal swab and anal swab were compared. Case presentation: A 3-month-old girl was admitted to our hospital with COVID-19. Her parents had both been diagnosed with COVID-19. The results of pharyngeal swab and anal swab of the little girl were recorded and compared during the course of the disease. The oropharyngeal specimen showed negative result for SARS-CoV-2 on the 14th day after onset of the illness. However, the anal swab was still positive for SARS-CoV-2 on the 28th day after the onset of the illness. Conclusion: The possibility of fecal-oral transmission of COVID-19 should be assessed. Personal hygiene during home quarantine merits considerable attention.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ped4.12186

RECORD 33
TITLE
  Mitigate the effects of home confinement on children during the COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang G.;  Zhang Y.;  Zhao J.;  Zhang J.;  Jiang F.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10228 (945-947). Date of Publication: 21 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30547-X

RECORD 34
TITLE
  Evolving reporting criteria of COVID-19 in Taiwan during the epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Huang Y.-C.;  Lee P.-I.;  Hsueh P.-R.
SOURCE
  Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.03.014

RECORD 35
TITLE
  Real estimates of mortality following COVID-19 infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Baud D.;  Qi X.;  Nielsen-Saines K.;  Musso D.;  Pomar L.;  Favre G.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Infectious Diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30195-X

RECORD 36
TITLE
  Point-of-Care Lung Ultrasound findings in novel coronavirus disease-19 pnemoniae: a case report and potential applications during COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Buonsenso D.;  Piano A.;  Raffaelli F.;  Bonadia N.;  de Gaetano Donati K.;  Franceschi F.
SOURCE
  European review for medical and pharmacological sciences (2020) 24:5 (2776-2780). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  An outbreak of a novel coronavirus disease-19 (nCoV-19) infection began in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and now involved the whole word. Several health workers have been infected in different countries. We report the case of a young man with documented nCoV-19 infection evaluated with lung ultrasound and discuss potential applications of lung ultrasound in this setting. Lung ultrasound allowed the identification of nCoV-19 infection at bed-side. Moreover, lung ultrasound can have several other advantages, such as reduced health worker exposition to infected patients, repeatability during follow-up, low-costs and easier application in low-resource settings.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.26355/eurrev_202003_20549

RECORD 37
TITLE
  Emergency plan for inter-hospital transfer of newborns with SARS-CoV-2 infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen Z.;  Du L.-Z.;  Fu J.-F.;  Shu Q.;  Chen Z.-M.;  Shi L.-P.;  Wang W.;  Chen S.-H.;  Ma X.-L.;  Ye S.;  Sun W.;  Chen M.-Y.;  Zhu H.-H.;  Huang G.-L.;  Luo F.-X.
SOURCE
  Zhongguo dang dai er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of contemporary pediatrics (2020) 22:3 (226-230). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has become the most serious public health issue. As the special population with immature immune function, newborns with COVID-19 have been reported. Newborns with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should be transferred to designated hospitals for isolation treatment. An emergency transfer response plan for newborns with COVID-19 has been worked out. This plan puts forward the indications for neonatal COVID-19 transfer, organization management, protection strategies for medical staff, work procedures, and disinfection methods for transfer equipment, in order to provide guidance and suggestions for the inter-hospital transfer of suspected or confirmed neonatal COVID-19.

RECORD 38
TITLE
  Clinical features and chest CT findings of coronavirus disease 2019 in infants and young children
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhou Y.;  Yang G.-D.;  Feng K.;  Huang H.;  Yun Y.-X.;  Mou X.-Y.;  Wang L.-F.
SOURCE
  Zhongguo dang dai er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of contemporary pediatrics (2020) 22:3 (215-220). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical features and chest CT findings of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in infants and young children. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data and chest CT images of 9 children, aged 0 to 3 years, who were diagnosed with COVID-19 by nucleic acid detection between January 20 and February 10, 2020. RESULTS: All 9 children had an epidemiological history, and family clustering was observed for all infected children. Among the 9 children with COVID-19, 5 had no symptoms, 4 had fever, 2 had cough, and 1 had rhinorrhea. There were only symptoms of the respiratory system. Laboratory examination showed no reductions in leukocyte or lymphocyte count. Among the 9 children, 6 had an increase in lymphocyte count and 2 had an increase in leukocyte count. CT examination showed that among the 9 children, 8 had pulmonary inflammation located below the pleura or near the interlobar fissure and 3 had lesions distributed along the bronchovascular bundles. As for the morphology of the lesions, 6 had nodular lesions and 7 had patchy lesions; ground glass opacity with consolidation was observed in 6 children, among whom 3 had halo sign, and there was no typical paving stone sign. CONCLUSIONS: Infants and young children with COVID-19 tend to have mild clinical symptoms and imaging findings not as typical as those of adults, and therefore, the diagnosis of COVID-19 should be made based on imaging findings along with epidemiological history and nucleic acid detection. Chest CT has guiding significance for the early diagnosis of asymptomatic children.

RECORD 39
TITLE
  Standardized management guideline for pediatric wards of hematology and oncology during the epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019
SOURCE
  Zhongguo dang dai er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of contemporary pediatrics (2020) 22:3 (177-182). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  With the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and growing knowledge of its diagnosis and treatment, it has been clear that children are also susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The children with hematological tumors are a special population with immunosuppression and special therapeutic characteristics. Here the management guideline for pediatric wards of hematology and oncology during COVID-19 epidemic is established based on the features of children with hematological tumors.

RECORD 40
TITLE
  Novel 2019 coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19): An updated overview for emergency clinicians
AUTHOR NAMES
  Giwa A.L.;  Desai A.;  Duca A.
SOURCE
  Emergency medicine practice (2020) 22:5 (1-28). Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has quickly become a worldwide threat to health, travel, and commerce. This overview analyzes the best information from the early research, including epidemiologic and demographic features from SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV viruses; lessons learned from the experience of an emergency physician in Northern Italy, where the outbreak has devastated the healthcare system; evidence on transmission and prevention through safe use of PPE; evidence and advice on SARS-CoV-2 testing and co-infection; management options; airway management options; steps for rapid sequence intubation in the ED and managing disaster ventilation; and information on managing pediatric and pregnant patients.

RECORD 41
TITLE
  Neonatal Early-Onset Infection with SARS-CoV-2 in 33 Neonates Born to Mothers with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zeng L.;  Xia S.;  Yuan W.;  Yan K.;  Xiao F.;  Shao J.;  Zhou W.
SOURCE
  JAMA Pediatrics (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0878

RECORD 42
TITLE
  Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Pregnancy: Responding to a Rapidly Evolving Situation
AUTHOR NAMES
  Rasmussen S.A.;  Jamieson D.J.
SOURCE
  Obstetrics and gynecology (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  As the world confronts coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an illness caused by yet another emerging pathogen (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS-CoV-2]), obstetric care providers are asking what this means for pregnant women. The global spread has been swift, and many key questions remain. The case-fatality rate for persons cared for in the United States and whether asymptomatic persons transmit the virus are examples of questions that need to be answered to inform public health control measures. There are also unanswered questions specific to pregnant women, such as whether pregnant women are more severely affected and whether intrauterine transmission occurs. Although guidelines for pregnant women from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been rapidly developed based on the best available evidence, additional information is critically needed to inform key decisions, such as whether pregnant health care workers should receive special consideration, whether to temporarily separate infected mothers and their newborns, and whether it is safe for infected women to breastfeed. Some current recommendations are well supported, based largely on what we know from seasonal influenza: patients should avoid contact with ill persons, avoid touching their face, cover coughs and sneezes, wash hands frequently, disinfect contaminated surfaces, and stay home when sick. Prenatal clinics should ensure all pregnant women and their visitors are screened for fever and respiratory symptoms, and symptomatic women should be isolated from well women and required to wear a mask. As the situation with COVID-19 rapidly unfolds, it is critical that obstetricians keep up to date.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000003873

RECORD 43
TITLE
  Safe Delivery for COVID-19 Infected Pregnancies
AUTHOR NAMES
  Qi H.;  Luo X.;  Zheng Y.;  Zhang H.;  Li J.;  Zou L.;  Feng L.;  Chen D.;  Shi Y.;  Tong C.;  Baker P.N.
SOURCE
  BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology (2020). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, a new coronavirus (COVID-19) infection has rapidly become prevalent in central China1 . On the basis of knowledge obtained from a previous coronavirus outbreak2 , pregnant women are believed to be susceptible to this virus. Once a maternal infection of COVID-19 is suspected or confirmed, childbirth becomes complicated and challenging. Efficient obstetric treatment is required, and is key to optimizing the prognosis for both mother and child. Care should be taken in determination of the timing of delivery, assessment of the indications for caesarean section, preparation of the delivery room to prevent infection, choice of the type of anesthesia, and newborn management.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.16231

RECORD 44
TITLE
  Oral Health Management of Children during the Epidemic Period of Coronavirus Disease 2019
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang Y.;  Zhou C.-C.;  Shu R.;  Zou J.
SOURCE
  Sichuan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Sichuan University. Medical science edition (2020) 51:2 (151-154). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is becoming a major public health event affecting China and even the whole world. During the epidemic period of corona virus disease, appropriate oral health management and disease prevention of children is very important for children’s oral and general health. In order to prevent the occurrence of cross-infection and epidemic spreading of COVID-19 during dental practice, the recommendations to parents include: not only training children to maintain hand hygiene at home, exercise appropriately, strengthen physical resistance, but also helping children develop good oral and diet habit such as effective brushing and flossing to avoid oral diseases and emergency. If non-emergency oral situation occur, parents could assist their child to take home based care such as rinsing to relieve the symptoms. When oral emergencies such as acute pulpitis, periapical periodontitis, dental trauma, oral and maxillofacial infections happen, parents and children should visit dental clinic in time with correct personal protection. During the epidemic period, children’s oral emergencies should be treated in accordance with current guidelines and control of COVID-19.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.12182/20200360101

RECORD 45
TITLE
  Experience of Clinical Management for Pregnant Women and Newborns with Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia in Tongji Hospital, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang S.-S.;  Zhou X.;  Lin X.-G.;  Liu Y.-Y.;  Wu J.-L.;  Sharifu L.M.;  Hu X.-L.;  Rong Z.-H.;  Liu W.;  Luo X.-P.;  Chen Z.;  Zeng W.-J.;  Chen S.-H.;  Ma D.;  Chen L.;  Feng L.
SOURCE
  Current medical science (2020). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Based on the New Diagnosis and Treatment Scheme for Novel Coronavirus Infected Pneumonia (Trial Edition 5), combined with our current clinical treatment experience, we recently proposed a revision of the first edition of “Guidance for maternal and fetal management during pneumonia epidemics of novel coronavirus infection in the Wuhan Tongji Hospital”. This article focused on the issues of greatest concern of pregnant women including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection diagnostic criteria, inspection precautions, drug treatment options, indications and methods of termination of pregnancy, postpartum fever, breastfeeding considerations, mode of mother-to-child transmission, neonatal isolation and advice on neonatal nursing, to provide valuable experience for better management of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women and newborns.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11596-020-2174-4

RECORD 46
TITLE
  The first infant case of COVID-19 acquired from a secondary transmission in Vietnam
AUTHOR NAMES
  Le H.T.;  Nguyen L.V.;  Tran D.M.;  Do H.T.;  Tran H.T.;  Le Y.T.;  Phan P.H.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Child & adolescent health (2020). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2352-4642(20)30091-2

RECORD 47
TITLE
  Epidemiological analysis on 1 052 cases of COVID-19 in epidemic clusters
AUTHOR NAMES
  Gan H.;  Zhang Y.;  Yuan M.;  Wu X.Y.;  Liu Z.R.;  Liu M.;  Wu J.B.;  Xu S.J.;  Gong L.;  Xu H.L.;  Tao F.B.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi (2020) 41:5 (E027). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Objective: To understand the epidemiological characteristics of the cases of COVID-19 epidemic clusters, and explore the influence of family factors and social factors such as group activities on the spread of the disease. Methods: The data of cases of COVID-19 epidemic clusters from 19 January, 2020 to 25 February, 2020 were collected from the official platforms of 36 cities in 6 provinces in China. Descriptive statistical methods, χ(2) test and curve fitting were used to analyze the epidemiological characteristics of the clustered cases. Results: By 25 February, 2020, the data of 1 052 cases in 366 epidemic clusters were collected. In these clustered cases, 86.9%(914/1 050) occurred in families. Among the 1 046 cases with gender information, 513 were males (49.0%) and 533 were females (51.0%). The cases were mainly young adults between 18 and 59 years old, accounting for 68.5% (711/1 038). In the 366 epidemic clusters , the clusters in which the first confirmed cases with the history of sojourn in Wuhan or Hubei accounted for 47.0%(172/366). From 19 January to 3 February, 2020, the first confirmed cases with Wuhan or Hubei sojourn history accounted for 66.5%. From 4 to 25 February, the first confirmed cases who had Wuhan or Hubei sojourn history accounted for only 18.2%. The median of interval between the first generation case onset and the second generation case onset was 5 (2-8) days. The median of onset- diagnosis interval of the initial cases was 6 (3-9) days, and the median of onset-diagnosis interval of the secondary cases was 5 (3-8) days. Conclusions: Epidemic clusters of COVID-19 were common in many cities outside Wuhan and Hubei. Close contact in family was one of the main causes for the spread of household transmission of the virus. After 4 February, the epidemic clusters were mainly caused by the first generation or second generation cases in local areas, and the time for diagnosis became shorter.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.cn112338-20200301-00223

RECORD 48
TITLE
  The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Hageman J.R.
SOURCE
  Pediatric Annals (2020) 49:3 (e99-e100). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/19382359-20200219-01

RECORD 49
TITLE
  Early epidemiological analysis of the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak based on crowdsourced data: a population-level observational study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sun K.;  Chen J.;  Viboud C.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Digital Health (2020) 2:4 (e201-e208). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: As the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) progresses, epidemiological data are needed to guide situational awareness and intervention strategies. Here we describe efforts to compile and disseminate epidemiological information on COVID-19 from news media and social networks. Methods: In this population-level observational study, we searched DXY.cn, a health-care-oriented social network that is currently streaming news reports on COVID-19 from local and national Chinese health agencies. We compiled a list of individual patients with COVID-19 and daily province-level case counts between Jan 13 and Jan 31, 2020, in China. We also compiled a list of internationally exported cases of COVID-19 from global news media sources (Kyodo News, The Straits Times, and CNN), national governments, and health authorities. We assessed trends in the epidemiology of COVID-19 and studied the outbreak progression across China, assessing delays between symptom onset, seeking care at a hospital or clinic, and reporting, before and after Jan 18, 2020, as awareness of the outbreak increased. All data were made publicly available in real time. Findings: We collected data for 507 patients with COVID-19 reported between Jan 13 and Jan 31, 2020, including 364 from mainland China and 143 from outside of China. 281 (55%) patients were male and the median age was 46 years (IQR 35–60). Few patients (13 [3%]) were younger than 15 years and the age profile of Chinese patients adjusted for baseline demographics confirmed a deficit of infections among children. Across the analysed period, delays between symptom onset and seeking care at a hospital or clinic were longer in Hubei province than in other provinces in mainland China and internationally. In mainland China, these delays decreased from 5 days before Jan 18, 2020, to 2 days thereafter until Jan 31, 2020 (p=0·0009). Although our sample captures only 507 (5·2%) of 9826 patients with COVID-19 reported by official sources during the analysed period, our data align with an official report published by Chinese authorities on Jan 28, 2020. Interpretation: News reports and social media can help reconstruct the progression of an outbreak and provide detailed patient-level data in the context of a health emergency. The availability of a central physician-oriented social network facilitated the compilation of publicly available COVID-19 data in China. As the outbreak progresses, social media and news reports will probably capture a diminishing fraction of COVID-19 cases globally due to reporting fatigue and overwhelmed health-care systems. In the early stages of an outbreak, availability of public datasets is important to encourage analytical efforts by independent teams and provide robust evidence to guide interventions. Funding: Fogarty International Center, US National Institutes of Health.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2589-7500(20)30026-1

RECORD 50
TITLE
  COVID-19 in Italy: momentous decisions and many uncertainties
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lazzerini M.;  Putoto G.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Global Health (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30110-8

RECORD 51
TITLE
  Practical Strategies Against the Novel Coronavirus and COVID-19—the Imminent Global Threat
AUTHOR NAMES
  Rahimi F.;  Talebi Bezmin Abadi A.
SOURCE
  Archives of Medical Research (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  The last month of 2019 harbingered the emergence of a viral outbreak that is now a major public threat globally. COVID-19 was first diagnosed and confirmed in a couple of cases with unknown pneumonia; the patients lived in, or travelled to, Wuhan, the capital of China’s Hubei province. People now face a complex challenge that deserves urgent intervention by all involved in medical healthcare globally. Conventional antiviral therapies or vaccines are the most referred means of tackling the virus, but we think establishing these ideal management strategies is presently far-fetched. In-house isolation or quarantine of suspected cases to keep hospital admissions manageable and prevent in-hospital spread of the virus, and promoting general awareness about transmission routes are the practical strategies used to tackle the spread of COVID-19. Cases with weakened or compromised immune systems—for example, elderly individuals, young children, and those with pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and chronic respiratory diseases—are particularly more susceptible to COVID-19. Hopefully, cumulative data using whole-genome sequencing of the SARS-CoV-2 genome in parallel with mathematical modeling will help the molecular biologists to understand unknown features of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of COVID-19.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arcmed.2020.03.005

RECORD 52
TITLE
  Clinical Characteristics of Children with Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Hubei, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zheng F.;  Liao C.;  Fan Q.-H.;  Chen H.-B.;  Zhao X.-G.;  Xie Z.-G.;  Li X.-L.;  Chen C.-X.;  Lu X.-X.;  Liu Z.-S.;  Lu W.;  Chen C.-B.;  Jiao R.;  Zhang A.-M.;  Wang J.-T.;  Ding X.-W.;  Zeng Y.-G.;  Cheng L.-P.;  Huang Q.-F.;  Wu J.;  Luo X.-C.;  Wang Z.-J.;  Zhong Y.-Y.;  Bai Y.;  Wu X.-Y.;  Jin R.-M.
SOURCE
  Current medical science (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, COVID-19 has occurred unexpectedly and emerged as a health problem worldwide. Despite the rapidly increasing number of cases in subsequent weeks, the clinical characteristics of pediatric cases are rarely described. A cross-sectional multicenter study was carried out in 10 hospitals across Hubei province. A total of 25 confirmed pediatric cases of COVID-19 were collected. The demographic data, epidemiological history, underlying diseases, clinical manifestations, laboratory and radiological data, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. Of 25 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, the boy to girl ratio was 1.27:1. The median age was 3 years. COVID-19 cases in children aged ❤ years, 3.6 years, and ≥6-years patients were 10 (40%), 6 (24%), and 9 (36%), respectively. The most common symptoms at onset of illness were fever (13 [52%]), and dry cough (11 [44%]). Chest CT images showed essential normal in 8 cases (33.3%), unilateral involvement of lungs in 5 cases (20.8%), and bilateral involvement in 11 cases (45.8%). Clinical diagnoses included upper respiratory tract infection (n=8), mild pneumonia (n=15), and critical cases (n=2). Two critical cases (8%) were given invasive mechanical ventilation, corticosteroids, and immunoglobulin. The symptoms in 24 (96%) of 25 patients were alleviated and one patient had been discharged. It was concluded that children were susceptible to COVID-19 like adults, while the clinical presentations and outcomes were more favorable in children. However, children less than 3 years old accounted for majority cases and critical cases lied in this age group, which demanded extra attentions during home caring and hospitalization treatment.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11596-020-2172-6

RECORD 53
TITLE
  Novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2: familial spread resulting in COVID-19 pneumonia in a pediatric patient
AUTHOR NAMES
  An P.;  Zhang M.
SOURCE
  Diagnostic and interventional radiology (Ankara, Turkey) (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/dir.2020.20157

RECORD 54
TITLE
  The different clinical characteristics of corona virus disease cases between children and their families in China – the character of children with COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Su L.;  Ma X.;  Yu H.;  Zhang Z.;  Bian P.;  Han Y.;  Sun J.;  Liu Y.;  Yang C.;  Geng J.;  Zhang Z.;  Gai Z.
SOURCE
  Emerging microbes & infections (2020) 9:1 (707-713). Date of Publication: 1 Dec 2020
ABSTRACT
  This study aims to analyze the different clinical characteristics between children and their families infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Clinical data from nine children and their 14 families were collected, including general status, clinical, laboratory test, and imaging characteristics. All the children were detected positive result after their families onset. Three children had fever (22.2%) or cough (11.2%) symptoms and six (66.7%) children had no symptom. Among the 14 adult patients, the major symptoms included fever (57.1%), cough (35.7%), chest tightness/pain (21.4%), fatigue (21.4%) and sore throat (7.1%). Nearly 70% of the patients had normal (71.4%) or decreased (28.6%) white blood cell counts, and 50% (7/14) had lymphocytopenia. There were 10 adults (71.4%) showed abnormal imaging. The main manifestations were pulmonary consolidation (70%), nodular shadow (50%), and ground glass opacity (50%). Five discharged children were admitted again because their stool showed positive result in SARS-CoV-2 PCR. COVID-19 in children is mainly caused by family transmission, and their symptoms are mild and prognosis is better than adult. However, their PCR result in stool showed longer time than their families. Because of the mild or asymptomatic clinical process, it is difficult to recognize early for pediatrician and public health staff.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22221751.2020.1744483

RECORD 55
TITLE
  Considerations for Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Procedures During the COVID-19 Pandemic Perspectives from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Emerging Leader Mentorship (SCAI ELM) Members and Graduates
AUTHOR NAMES
  Szerlip M.;  Anwaruddin S.;  Aronow H.D.;  Cohen M.G.;  Daniels M.J.;  Dehghani P.;  Drachman D.E.;  Elmariah S.;  Feldman D.N.;  Garcia S.;  Giri J.;  Kaul P.;  Kapur N.;  Kumbhani D.J.;  Meraj P.M.;  Morray B.;  Nayak K.R.;  Parikh S.A.;  Sakhuja R.;  Schussler J.M.;  Seto A.;  Shah B.;  Swaminathan R.V.;  Zidar D.A.;  Naidu S.S.
SOURCE
  Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccd.28887

RECORD 56
TITLE
  Why is COVID-19 so mild in children?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Brodin P.
SOURCE
  Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  There is an urgent need to understand why the course of the coronavirus that started in late 2019 (COVID-19) is affecting different groups of individuals with varying severity during the ongoing global pandemic. Greater knowledge of the disease, which is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2), will help us to prioritise our limited health resources. Because the virus is new, and no vaccine is yet available, everyone is naïve and susceptible to being infected with SARS-CoV2. The virus will continue to spread until an effective vaccine exists or sufficient members of our global population have been infected to establish herd immunity. At the moment, the best way to minimize loss of life and severe cases requiring intensive care is to try and shelter vulnerable groups of individuals and slow down the spread of the virus.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15271

RECORD 57
TITLE
  Epidemiological data from the COVID-19 outbreak, real-time case information
AUTHOR NAMES
  Xu B.;  Gutierrez B.;  Mekaru S.;  Sewalk K.;  Goodwin L.;  Loskill A.;  Cohn E.L.;  Hswen Y.;  Hill S.C.;  Cobo M.M.;  Zarebski A.E.;  Li S.;  Wu C.-H.;  Hulland E.;  Morgan J.D.;  Wang L.;  O’Brien K.;  Scarpino S.V.;  Brownstein J.S.;  Pybus O.G.;  Pigott D.M.;  Kraemer M.U.G.
SOURCE
  Scientific data (2020) 7:1 (106). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Cases of a novel coronavirus were first reported in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, in December 2019 and have since spread across the world. Epidemiological studies have indicated human-to-human transmission in China and elsewhere. To aid the analysis and tracking of the COVID-19 epidemic we collected and curated individual-level data from national, provincial, and municipal health reports, as well as additional information from online reports. All data are geo-coded and, where available, include symptoms, key dates (date of onset, admission, and confirmation), and travel history. The generation of detailed, real-time, and robust data for emerging disease outbreaks is important and can help to generate robust evidence that will support and inform public health decision making.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-020-0448-0

RECORD 58
TITLE
  The Rheumatologist’s Role in Covid-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cron R.Q.;  Chatham W.W.
SOURCE
  The Journal of rheumatology (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has spread rapidly throughout the planet. It is believed to have originated in the Wuhan province of China, but this highly contagious respiratory virus has spread to over 140 countries on 6 continents as of mid-March 2020 according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Worldwide, there have been over 164,000 cases identified and over 6,500 deaths attributed to the viral infection. As of March 15, 2020, there are over 3,700 confirmed cases and 68 deaths ascribed to Covid-19 (the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2) in the United States [https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-updates-unitedstates.html].
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.200334

RECORD 59
TITLE
  COVID-19 in pregnant women – Authors’ reply
AUTHOR NAMES
  Baud D.;  Giannoni E.;  Pomar L.;  Qi X.;  Nielsen-Saines K.;  Musso D.;  Favre G.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Infectious Diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30192-4

RECORD 60
TITLE
  Diagnosis and treatment recommendation for pediatric coronavirus disease-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen Z.;  Fu J.;  Shu Q.;  Chen Y.;  Hua C.;  Li F.;  Lin R.;  Tang L.;  Wang T.;  Wang W.;  Wang Y.;  Xu W.;  Yang Z.;  Ye S.;  Yuan T.;  Zhang C.;  Zhang Y.
SOURCE
  Zhejiang da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Zhejiang University. Medical sciences (2020) 49:1 (1-8). Date of Publication: 25 May 2020

RECORD 61
TITLE
  A Well Infant with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) with High Viral Load
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kam K.-Q.;  Yung C.F.;  Cui L.;  Lin Tzer Pin R.;  Mak T.M.;  Maiwald M.;  Li J.;  Chong C.Y.;  Nadua K.;  Tan N.W.H.;  Thoon K.C.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 28 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  A well 6-month-old infant with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had persistently positive nasopharyngeal swabs to day 16 of admission. This case highlights the difficulties in establishing the true incidence of COVID-19 as asymptomatic individuals can excrete the virus. These patients may play important roles in human-to-human transmission in the community.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa201

RECORD 62
TITLE
  Report on the Epidemiological Features of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Outbreak in the Republic of Korea from January 19 to March 2, 2020
SOURCE
  Journal of Korean medical science (2020) 35:10 (e112). Date of Publication: 16 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since the first case of coronavirus disease19 (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan, China, as of March 2, 2020, the total number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 was 89,069 cases in 67 countries and regions. As of 0 am, March 2, 2020, the Republic of Korea had the second-largest number of confirmed cases (n = 4,212) after China (n = 80,026). This report summarizes the epidemiologic features and the snapshots of the outbreak in the Republic of Korea from January 19 and March 2, 2020.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e112

RECORD 63
TITLE
  Estimating the asymptomatic proportion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship, Yokohama, Japan, 2020
AUTHOR NAMES
  Mizumoto K.;  Kagaya K.;  Zarebski A.;  Chowell G.
SOURCE
  Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin (2020) 25:10. Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  On 5 February 2020, in Yokohama, Japan, a cruise ship hosting 3,711 people underwent a 2-week quarantine after a former passenger was found with COVID-19 post-disembarking. As at 20 February, 634 persons on board tested positive for the causative virus. We conducted statistical modelling to derive the delay-adjusted asymptomatic proportion of infections, along with the infections’ timeline. The estimated asymptomatic proportion was 17.9% (95% credible interval (CrI): 15.5-20.2%). Most infections occurred before the quarantine start.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.10.2000180

RECORD 64
TITLE
  COVID-19, Australia: Epidemiology Report 7 (Reporting week ending 19:00 AEDT 14 March 2020)
SOURCE
  Communicable diseases intelligence (2018) (2020) 44. Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  This is the seventh epidemiological report for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), reported in Australia as at 19:00 Australian Eastern Daylight Time [AEDT] 14 March 2020. It includes data on COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Australia, the international situation and a review of current evidence.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.33321/cdi.2020.44.23

RECORD 65
TITLE
  First Pediatric Case of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Korea
AUTHOR NAMES
  Park J.Y.;  Han M.S.;  Park K.U.;  Kim J.Y.;  Choi E.H.
SOURCE
  Journal of Korean medical science (2020) 35:11 (e124). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The large outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) that started in Wuhan, China has now spread to many countries worldwide. Current epidemiologic knowledge suggests that relatively few cases are seen among children, which limits opportunities to address pediatric specific issues on infection control and the children’s contribution to viral spread in the community. Here, we report the first pediatric case of COVID-19 in Korea. The 10-year-old girl was a close contact of her uncle and her mother who were confirmed to have COVID-19. In this report, we present mild clinical course of her pneumonia that did not require antiviral treatment and serial viral test results from multiple specimens. Lastly, we raise concerns on the optimal strategy of self-quarantine and patient care in a negative isolation room for children.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e124

RECORD 66
TITLE
  Are We Ready for Coronavirus Disease 2019 Arriving at Schools?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Choe Y.J.;  Choi E.H.
SOURCE
  Journal of Korean medical science (2020) 35:11 (e127). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e127

RECORD 67
TITLE
  COVID-19 outbreak: less stethoscope, more ultrasound
AUTHOR NAMES
  Buonsenso D.;  Pata D.;  Chiaretti A.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Respiratory medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 20 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(20)30120-X

RECORD 68
TITLE
  Aggregated mobility data could help fight COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Buckee C.O.;  Balsari S.;  Chan J.;  Crosas M.;  Dominici F.;  Gasser U.;  Grad Y.H.;  Grenfell B.;  Halloran M.E.;  Kraemer M.U.G.;  Lipsitch M.;  Metcalf C.J.E.;  Meyers L.A.;  Perkins T.A.;  Santillana M.;  Scarpino S.V.;  Viboud C.;  Wesolowski A.;  Schroeder A.
SOURCE
  Science (New York, N.Y.) (2020). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.abb8021

RECORD 69
TITLE
  Planning and provision of ECMO services for severe ARDS during the COVID-19 pandemic and other outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ramanathan K.;  Antognini D.;  Combes A.;  Paden M.;  Zakhary B.;  Ogino M.;  MacLaren G.;  Brodie D.;  Shekar K.
SOURCE
  The Lancet. Respiratory medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 20 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  WHO interim guidelines recommend offering extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to eligible patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The number of patients with COVID-19 infection who might develop severe ARDS that is refractory to maximal medical management and require this level of support is currently unknown. Available evidence from similar patient populations suggests that carefully selected patients with severe ARDS who do not benefit from conventional treatment might be successfully supported with venovenous ECMO. The need for ECMO is relatively low and its use is mostly restricted to specialised centres globally. Providing complex therapies such as ECMO during outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases has unique challenges. Careful planning, judicious resource allocation, and training of personnel to provide complex therapeutic interventions while adhering to strict infection control measures are all crucial components of an ECMO action plan. ECMO can be initiated in specialist centres, or patients can receive ECMO during transportation from a centre that is not specialised for this procedure to an expert ECMO centre. Ensuring that systems enable safe and coordinated movement of critically ill patients, staff, and equipment is important to improve ECMO access. ECMO preparedness for the COVID-19 pandemic is important in view of the high transmission rate of the virus and respiratory-related mortality.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(20)30121-1

RECORD 70
TITLE
  Early estimation of the case fatality rate of COVID-19 in mainland China: A data-driven analysis
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yang S.;  Cao P.;  Du P.;  Wu Z.;  Zhuang Z.;  Yang L.;  Yu X.;  Zhou Q.;  Feng X.;  Wang X.;  Li W.;  Liu E.;  Chen J.;  Chen Y.;  He D.
SOURCE
  Annals of Translational Medicine (2020) 8:4. Date of Publication: 1 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: An ongoing outbreak of pneumonia caused by a novel coronavirus [severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2], named COVID-19, hit a major city of China, Wuhan in December 2019 and subsequently spread to other provinces/regions of China and overseas. Several studies have been done to estimate the basic reproduction number in the early phase of this outbreak, yet there are no reliable estimates of case fatality rate (CFR) for COVID-19 to date. Methods: In this study, we used a purely data-driven statistical method to estimate the CFR in the early phase of the COVID-19 outbreak. Daily numbers of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths were collected from January 10 to February 3, 2020 and divided into three clusters: Wuhan city, other cities of Hubei province, and other provinces of mainland China. Simple linear regression model was applied to estimate the CFR from each cluster. Results: We estimated that CFR during the first weeks of the epidemic ranges from 0.15% (95% CI: 0.120.18%) in mainland China excluding Hubei through 1.41% (95% CI: 1.381.45%) in Hubei province excluding the city of Wuhan to 5.25% (95% CI: 4.985.51%) in Wuhan. Conclusions: Our early estimates suggest that the CFR of COVID-19 is lower than the previous coronavirus epidemics caused by SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/atm.2020.02.66

RECORD 71
TITLE
  What Does the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Mean for Families?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Thompson L.A.;  Rasmussen S.A.
SOURCE
  JAMA Pediatrics (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0828

RECORD 72
TITLE
  Systematic review of COVID-19 in children show milder cases and a better prognosis than adults
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ludvigsson J.F.
SOURCE
  Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) (2020). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  AIM: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected hundreds of thousands of people. Data on symptoms and prognoses in children are rare. METHODS: A systematic literature review was carried out to identify papers on COVID-19, which is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), using the Medline and EMBASE databases between 1 January and 18 March 2020. RESULTS: The search identified 45 relevant scientific papers and letters. The review showed that children have so far accounted for 1-5% of diagnosed COVID-19 cases, they often have milder disease than adults and deaths have been extremely rare. Diagnostic findings have been similar to adults, with fever and respiratory symptoms being prevalent, but fewer children seem to have developed severe pneumonia. Elevated inflammatory markers were less common in children and lymphocytopenia seemed rare. Newborn infants have developed symptomatic COVID-19, but evidence of vertical intrauterine transmission was scarce. Suggested treatment included providing oxygen, inhalations, nutritional support and maintaining fluids and electrolyte balances. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has occurred in children, but they seemed to have a milder disease course and better prognoses than adults. Deaths were extremely rare.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15270

RECORD 73
TITLE
  Questions raised by COVID-19 case descriptions
AUTHOR NAMES
  Britton P.N.;  Marais B.J.
SOURCE
  Journal of paediatrics and child health (2020). Date of Publication: 22 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14872

RECORD 74
TITLE
  A COVID-19 Transmission within a family cluster by presymptomatic infectors in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Qian G.;  Yang N.;  Ma A.H.Y.;  Wang L.;  Li G.;  Chen X.;  Chen X.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  We report a COVID-19 family cluster caused by a presymptomatic case. There were 9 family members, including 8 laboratory-confirmed with COVID-19, and a 6-year-old child had no evidence of infection. Amongst the 8 patients, one adult and one 13-month-old infant were asymptomatic, one adult was diagnosed as having severe pneumonia.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa316

RECORD 75
TITLE
  Clinical features in pediatric COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yasri S.;  Wiwanitkit V.
SOURCE
  Pediatric Pulmonology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.24737

RECORD 76
TITLE
  Clinical and CT imaging features of the COVID-19 pneumonia: Focus on pregnant women and children
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu H.;  Liu F.;  Li J.;  Zhang T.;  Wang D.;  Lan W.
SOURCE
  Journal of Infection (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: The ongoing outbreak of COVID-19 pneumonia is globally concerning. We aimed to investigate the clinical and CT features in the pregnant women and children with this disease, which have not been well reported. Methods: Clinical and CT data of 59 patients with COVID-19 from January 27 to February 14, 2020 were retrospectively reviewed, including 14 laboratory-confirmed non-pregnant adults, 16 laboratory-confirmed and 25 clinically-diagnosed pregnant women, and 4 laboratory-confirmed children. The clinical and CT features were analyzed and compared. Findings: Compared with the non-pregnant adults group (n = 14), initial normal body temperature (9 [56%] and 16 [64%]), leukocytosis (8 [50%] and 9 [36%]) and elevated neutrophil ratio (14 [88%] and 20 [80%]), and lymphopenia (9 [56%] and 16 [64%]) were more common in the laboratory-confirmed (n = 16) and clinically-diagnosed (n = 25) pregnant groups. Totally 614 lesions were detected with predominantly peripheral and bilateral distributions in 54 (98%) and 37 (67%) patients, respectively. Pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) was the predominant presence in 94/131 (72%) lesions for the non-pregnant adults. Mixed consolidation and complete consolidation were more common in the laboratory-confirmed (70/161 [43%]) and clinically-diagnosed (153/322 [48%]) pregnant groups than 37/131 (28%) in the non-pregnant adults (P = 0·007, P < 0·001). GGO with reticulation was less common in 9/161 (6%) and 16/322 (5%) lesions for the two pregnant groups than 24/131 (18%) for the non-pregnant adults (P = 0·001, P < 0·001). The pulmonary involvement in children with COVID-19 was mild with a focal GGO or consolidation. Twenty-three patients underwent follow-up CT, revealing progression in 9/13 (69%) at 3 days whereas improvement in 8/10 (80%) at 6–9 days after initial CT scans. Interpretation: Atypical clinical findings of pregnant women with COVID-19 could increase the difficulty in initial identification. Consolidation was more common in the pregnant groups. The clinically-diagnosed cases were vulnerable to more pulmonary involvement. CT was the modality of choice for early detection, severity assessment, and timely therapeutic effects evaluation for the cases with epidemic and clinical features of COVID-19 with or without laboratory confirmation. The exposure history and clinical symptoms were more helpful for screening in children versus chest CT.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2020.03.007

RECORD 77
TITLE
  Clinical and biochemical indexes from 2019-nCoV infected patients linked to viral loads and lung injury
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu Y.;  Yang Y.;  Zhang C.;  Huang F.;  Wang F.;  Yuan J.;  Wang Z.;  Li J.;  Li J.;  Feng C.;  Zhang Z.;  Wang L.;  Peng L.;  Chen L.;  Qin Y.;  Zhao D.;  Tan S.;  Yin L.;  Xu J.;  Zhou C.;  Jiang C.;  Liu L.
SOURCE
  Science China. Life sciences (2020) 63:3 (364-374). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The outbreak of the 2019-nCoV infection began in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei province, and rapidly spread to many provinces in China as well as other countries. Here we report the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics, as well as potential biomarkers for predicting disease severity in 2019-nCoV-infected patients in Shenzhen, China. All 12 cases of the 2019-nCoV-infected patients developed pneumonia and half of them developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The most common laboratory abnormalities were hypoalbuminemia, lymphopenia, decreased percentage of lymphocytes (LYM) and neutrophils (NEU), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and decreased CD8 count. The viral load of 2019-nCoV detected from patient respiratory tracts was positively linked to lung disease severity. ALB, LYM, LYM (%), LDH, NEU (%), and CRP were highly correlated to the acute lung injury. Age, viral load, lung injury score, and blood biochemistry indexes, albumin (ALB), CRP, LDH, LYM (%), LYM, and NEU (%), may be predictors of disease severity. Moreover, the Angiotensin II level in the plasma sample from 2019-nCoV infected patients was markedly elevated and linearly associated to viral load and lung injury. Our results suggest a number of potential diagnosis biomarkers and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) drugs for potential repurposing treatment of 2019-nCoV infection.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11427-020-1643-8

RECORD 78
TITLE
  Clinical features of severe pediatric patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in Wuhan: a single center’s observational study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sun D.;  Li H.;  Lu X.-X.;  Xiao H.;  Ren J.;  Zhang F.-R.;  Liu Z.-S.
SOURCE
  World journal of pediatrics : WJP (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 was first detected in Wuhan, Hubei, China. People of all ages are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. No information on severe pediatric patients with COVID-19 has been reported. We aimed to describe the clinical features of severe pediatric patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We included eight severe or critically ill patients with COVID-19 who were treated at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Wuhan Children’s Hospital from January 24 to February 24. We collected information including demographic data, symptoms, imaging data, laboratory findings, treatments and clinical outcomes of the patients with severe COVID-19. RESULTS: The onset age of the eight patients ranged from 2 months to 15 years; six were boys. The most common symptoms were polypnea (8/8), followed by fever (6/8) and cough (6/8). Chest imaging showed multiple patch-like shadows in seven patients and ground-glass opacity in six. Laboratory findings revealed normal or increased whole blood counts (7/8), increased C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and lactate dehydrogenase (6/8), and abnormal liver function (4/8). Other findings included decreased CD16 + CD56 (4/8) and Th/Ts*(1/8), increased CD3 (2/8), CD4 (4/8) and CD8 (1/8), IL-6 (2/8), IL-10 (5/8) and IFN-γ (2/8). Treatment modalities were focused on symptomatic and respiratory support. Two critically ill patients underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Up to February 24, 2020, three patients remained under treatment in ICU, the other five recovered and were discharged home. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of severe pediatric patients in Wuhan, polypnea was the most common symptom, followed by fever and cough. Common imaging changes included multiple patch-like shadows and ground-glass opacity; and a cytokine storm was found in these patients, which appeared more serious in critically ill patients.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12519-020-00354-4

RECORD 79
TITLE
  Expert consensus for managing pregnant women and neonates born to mothers with suspected or confirmed novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen D.;  Yang H.;  Cao Y.;  Cheng W.;  Duan T.;  Fan C.;  Fan S.;  Feng L.;  Gao Y.;  He F.;  He J.;  Hu Y.;  Jiang Y.;  Li Y.;  Li J.;  Li X.;  Li X.;  Lin K.;  Liu C.;  Liu J.;  Liu X.;  Pan X.;  Pang Q.;  Pu M.;  Qi H.;  Shi C.;  Sun Y.;  Sun J.;  Wang X.;  Wang Y.;  Wang Z.;  Wang Z.;  Wang C.;  Wu S.;  Xin H.;  Yan J.;  Zhao Y.;  Zheng J.;  Zhou Y.;  Zou L.;  Zeng Y.;  Zhang Y.;  Guan X.;  Eppes C.S.;  Fox K.;  Belfort M.A.
SOURCE
  International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (2020). Date of Publication: 20 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  OBJECTIVE: To provide clinical management guidelines for novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in pregnancy. METHODS: On February 5, 2020, a multidisciplinary teleconference comprising Chinese physicians and researchers was held and medical management strategies of COVID-19 infection in pregnancy were discussed. RESULTS: Ten key recommendations were provided for the management of COVID-19 infections in pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Currently, there is no clear evidence regarding optimal delivery timing, the safety of vaginal delivery, or whether cesarean delivery prevents vertical transmission at the time of delivery; therefore, route of delivery and delivery timing should be individualized based on obstetrical indications and maternal-fetal status.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijgo.13146

RECORD 80
TITLE
  The potential added value of FDG PET/CT for COVID-19 pneumonia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Deng Y.;  Lei L.;  Chen Y.;  Zhang W.
SOURCE
  European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging (2020). Date of Publication: 21 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-020-04767-1

RECORD 81
TITLE
  Is there a role for lung ultrasound during the COVID-19 pandemic?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Soldati G.;  Smargiassi A.;  Inchingolo R.;  Buonsenso D.;  Perrone T.;  Briganti D.F.;  Perlini S.;  Torri E.;  Mariani A.;  Mossolani E.E.;  Tursi F.;  Mento F.;  Demi L.
SOURCE
  Journal of ultrasound in medicine : official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 20 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jum.15284

RECORD 82
TITLE
  CT manifestations of coronavirus disease-2019: A retrospective analysis of 73 cases by disease severity
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu K.-C.;  Xu P.;  Lv W.-F.;  Qiu X.-H.;  Yao J.-L.;  Gu J.-F.;  Wei W.
SOURCE
  European Journal of Radiology (2020) 126 Article Number: 108941. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  Purpose: To report CT features of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in patients with various disease severity. Methods: The CT manifestations and clinical data of 73 patients with COVID-19 were retrospectively collected in 6 hospitals from Jan 21 to Feb 3, 2020. We analyzed the initial and follow-up CT features of patients with disease severity, according to the Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of New Coronavirus Pneumonia. Results: Six patients (8%) were diagnosed as mild type pneumonia; these patients had no obvious abnormal CT findings or manifested mild changes of lung infection. All 43 patients (59 %) with common type presented unique or multiple ground-glass opacities (GGO) in the periphery of the lungs, with or without interlobular septal thickening. In the 21 patients (29 %) with severe type, extensive GGO and pulmonary consolidation were found in 16 cases (16/21, 76 %) and 5 cases (24 %), respectively. An extensive “white lung”, with atelectasis and pleural effusion were found in critical type patients (3, 4%). On the resolutive phase of the disease, CT abnormalities showed complete resolution, or demonstrated residual linear opacities. Conclusions: Different CT features are seen according to disease severity, which can help COVID-19 stratification.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2020.108941

RECORD 83
TITLE
  2019 novel coronavirus infection in a three-month-old baby
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhang Y.H.;  Lin D.J.;  Xiao M.F.;  Wang J.C.;  Wei Y.;  Lei Z.X.;  Zeng Z.Q.;  Li L.;  Li H.A.;  Xiang W.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics (2020) 58:3 (182-184). Date of Publication: 2 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1310.2020.03.004

RECORD 84
TITLE
  Prevention and control program on 2019 novel coronavirus infection in children’s digestive endoscopy center
SOURCE
  Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics (2020) 58:3 (175-178). Date of Publication: 2 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1310.2020.03.002

RECORD 85
TITLE
  First cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the WHO European Region, 24 January to 21 February 2020
AUTHOR NAMES
  Spiteri G.;  Fielding J.;  Diercke M.;  Campese C.;  Enouf V.;  Gaymard A.;  Bella A.;  Sognamiglio P.;  Sierra Moros M.J.;  Riutort A.N.;  Demina Y.V.;  Mahieu R.;  Broas M.;  Bengnér M.;  Buda S.;  Schilling J.;  Filleul L.;  Lepoutre A.;  Saura C.;  Mailles A.;  Levy-Bruhl D.;  Coignard B.;  Bernard-Stoecklin S.;  Behillil S.;  van der Werf S.;  Valette M.;  Lina B.;  Riccardo F.;  Nicastri E.;  Casas I.;  Larrauri A.;  Salom Castell M.;  Pozo F.;  Maksyutov R.A.;  Martin C.;  Van Ranst M.;  Bossuyt N.;  Siira L.;  Sane J.;  Tegmark-Wisell K.;  Palmérus M.;  Broberg E.K.;  Beauté J.;  Jorgensen P.;  Bundle N.;  Pereyaslov D.;  Adlhoch C.;  Pukkila J.;  Pebody R.;  Olsen S.;  Ciancio B.C.
SOURCE
  Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin (2020) 25:9. Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  In the WHO European Region, COVID-19 surveillance was implemented 27 January 2020. We detail the first European cases. As at 21 February, nine European countries reported 47 cases. Among 38 cases studied, 21 were linked to two clusters in Germany and France, 14 were infected in China. Median case age was 42 years; 25 were male. Late detection of the clusters’ index cases delayed isolation of further local cases. As at 5 March, there were 4,250 cases.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.9.2000178

RECORD 86
TITLE
  COVID-19, Australia: Epidemiology Report 6 (Reporting week ending 19:00 AEDT 7 March 2020)
SOURCE
  Communicable diseases intelligence (2018) (2020) 44. Date of Publication: 11 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  This is the sixth epidemiological report for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), reported in Australia as at 19:00 Australian Eastern Daylight Time [AEDT] 7 March 2020. It includes data on COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Australia, the international situation and a review of current evidence.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.33321/cdi.2020.44.21

RECORD 87
TITLE
  Laboratory abnormalities in children with novel coronavirus disease 2019
AUTHOR NAMES
  Henry B.M.;  Lippi G.;  Plebani M.
SOURCE
  Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 16 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2020-0272

RECORD 88
TITLE
  Clinical outcome of 55 asymptomatic cases at the time of hospital admission infected with SARS-Coronavirus-2 in Shenzhen, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang Y.;  Liu Y.;  Liu L.;  Wang X.;  Luo N.;  Ling L.
SOURCE
  The Journal of infectious diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  An epidemic caused by SARS-Coronavirus-2 infection has spread unexpectedly in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China since December 2019. It is rarely reported about asymptomatic cases screened from close contacts. We study epidemiological and clinical outcome of 55 asymptomatic carriers who were laboratory-confirmed positive for the SARS-Coronavirus-2 by testing the nucleic acid of the pharyngeal swab samples. The evidence showed that asymptomatic carriers occurred more often in middle aged people who had close contact with infected family members. The majority of the cases developed to be mild and ordinary COVID-19 during hospital.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiaa119

RECORD 89
TITLE
  A 55-Day-Old Female Infant infected with COVID 19: presenting with pneumonia, liver injury, and heart damage
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cui Y.;  Tian M.;  Huang D.;  Wang X.;  Huang Y.;  Fan L.;  Wang L.;  Chen Y.;  Liu W.;  Zhang K.;  Wu Y.;  Yang Z.;  Tao J.;  Feng J.;  Liu K.;  Ye X.;  Wang R.;  Zhang X.;  Zha Y.
SOURCE
  The Journal of infectious diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Previous studies on the pneumonia outbreak caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) were mainly based on information from adult populations. Limited data are available for children with COVID-19, especially for infected infants. We report a 55-day-old case with COVID-19 confirmed in China and describe the identification, diagnosis, clinical course, and treatment of the patient, including the disease progression from day 7 to day 11 of illness. This case highlights that children with COVID-19 can also present with multiple organ damage and rapid disease changes. When managing such patients, frequent and careful clinical monitoring is essential.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiaa113

RECORD 90
TITLE
  COVID-19 in Children: Initial Characterization of the Pediatric Disease
SOURCE
  Pediatrics (2020). Date of Publication: 16 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2020-0834

RECORD 91
TITLE
  Coronavirus in pregnancy and delivery: rapid review
AUTHOR NAMES
  Mullins E.;  Evans D.;  Viner R.M.;  O’Brien P.;  Morris E.
SOURCE
  Ultrasound in obstetrics & gynecology : the official journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (2020). Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/uog.22014

RECORD 92
TITLE
  Clinical features of pediatric patients with COVID-19: a report of two family cluster cases
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ji L.-N.;  Chao S.;  Wang Y.-J.;  Li X.-J.;  Mu X.-D.;  Lin M.-G.;  Jiang R.-M.
SOURCE
  World journal of pediatrics : WJP (2020). Date of Publication: 16 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: Coronovirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the globe. People of all ages are susceptible to COVID-19. However, literature reports on pediatric patients are limited. METHODS: To improve the recognition of COVID-19 infection in children, we retrospectively reviewed two confirmed pediatric cases from two family clusters. Both clinical features and laboratory examination results of the children and their family members were described. RESULTS: The two confirmed children only presented with mild respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. Both of them had normal chest CT images. After general and symptomatic treatments, both children recovered quickly. Both families had travel histories to Hubei Province. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients with COVID-19 are mostly owing to family cluster or with a close contact history. Infected children have relatively milder clinical symptoms than infected adults. We should attach importance to early recognition, early diagnosis, and early treatment of infected children.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12519-020-00356-2

RECORD 93
TITLE
  Perinatal Transmission of COVID-19 Associated SARS-CoV-2: Should We Worry?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Fan C.;  Lei D.;  Fang C.;  Li C.;  Wang M.;  Liu Y.;  Bao Y.;  Sun Y.;  Huang J.;  Guo Y.;  Yu Y.;  Wang S.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  We presented two cases of COVID-19 associated SARS-CoV-2 infection during third trimester of pregnancy. Both mothers and newborns had excellent outcomes. We failed to identify SARS-CoV-2 in all the products of conception and the newborns. This report provided evidence of low risk of intrauterine infection by vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa226

RECORD 94
TITLE
  Management strategies of neonatal jaundice during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ma X.-L.;  Chen Z.;  Zhu J.-J.;  Shen X.-X.;  Wu M.-Y.;  Shi L.-P.;  Du L.-Z.;  Fu J.-F.;  Shu Q.
SOURCE
  World Journal of Pediatrics (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19; formally known as 2019-nCoV) has become a most challenging health emergency. Owing to rigorous quarantine and control measures taken in China, routine neonatal health surveillance and follow-up have become challenging. Without follow-up surveillance, some rapid and progressive newborn diseases, such as bilirubin encephalopathy, may be ignored. The characteristics of onset age of kernicterus suggest that monitoring of bilirubin level at home provides a useful way to alert hospital visits and to prevent the development of extremely hyperbilirubinemia. Therefore, we developed an online follow-up program for convenient monitoring of bilirubin level of newborns that is based on our practical experiences. The aim is to make our management strategies of neonatal jaundice tailored to the infection prevention and control during the COVID-19 epidemic.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12519-020-00347-3

RECORD 95
TITLE
  Asymptomatic carrier state, acute respiratory disease, and pneumonia due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): Facts and myths
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lai C.-C.;  Liu Y.H.;  Wang C.-Y.;  Wang Y.-H.;  Hsueh S.-C.;  Yen M.-Y.;  Ko W.-C.;  Hsueh P.-R.
SOURCE
  Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (formerly known as the 2019 novel coronavirus [2019-nCoV]) in Wuhan, China in December 2019, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), more than 75,000 cases have been reported in 32 countries/regions, resulting in more than 2000 deaths worldwide. Despite the fact that most COVID-19 cases and mortalities were reported in China, the WHO has declared this outbreak as the sixth public health emergency of international concern. The COVID-19 can present as an asymptomatic carrier state, acute respiratory disease, and pneumonia. Adults represent the population with the highest infection rate; however, neonates, children, and elderly patients can also be infected by SARS-CoV-2. In addition, nosocomial infection of hospitalized patients and healthcare workers, and viral transmission from asymptomatic carriers are possible. The most common finding on chest imaging among patients with pneumonia was ground-glass opacity with bilateral involvement. Severe cases are more likely to be older patients with underlying comorbidities compared to mild cases. Indeed, age and disease severity may be correlated with the outcomes of COVID-19. To date, effective treatment is lacking; however, clinical trials investigating the efficacy of several agents, including remdesivir and chloroquine, are underway in China. Currently, effective infection control intervention is the only way to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.02.012

RECORD 96
TITLE
  Recommendations on the clinical management of the COVID-19 infection by the «new coronavirus» SARS-CoV2. Spanish Paediatric Association working group
AUTHOR NAMES
  Calvo C.;  García López-Hortelano M.;  de Carlos Vicente J.C.;  Vázquez Martínez J.L.;  Ramos J.T.;  Baquero-Artigao F.;  Navarro M.L.;  Rodrigo C.;  Neth O.;  Fumadó V.;  Menendez Suso J.J.;  Slocker Barrio M.;  Bustinza Arriortua A.;  Jordán García I.;  Pilar Orive J.
SOURCE
  Anales de Pediatria (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  On 31 December 2019, the Wuhan Municipal Committee of Health and Healthcare (Hubei Province, China) reported that there were 27 cases of pneumonia of unknown origin with symptoms starting on the 8 December. There were 7 serious cases with common exposure in market with shellfish, fish, and live animals, in the city of Wuhan. On 7 January 2020, the Chinese authorities identified that the agent causing the outbreak was a new type of virus of the Coronaviridae family, temporarily called «new coronavirus», 2019-nCoV. On January 30th, 2020, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the outbreak an International Emergency. On 11 February 2020 the WHO assigned it the name of SARS-CoV2 and COVID-19 (SARS-CoV2 and COVID-19). The Ministry of Health summoned the Specialties Societies to prepare a clinical protocol for the management of COVID-19. The Spanish Paediatric Association appointed a Working Group of the Societies of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and Paediatric Intensive Care to prepare the present recommendations with the evidence available at the time of preparing them.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anpedi.2020.02.001

RECORD 97
TITLE
  Clinical characteristics of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in newborns, infants and children
AUTHOR NAMES
  Hong H.;  Wang Y.;  Chung H.-T.;  Chen C.-J.
SOURCE
  Pediatrics and Neonatology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedneo.2020.03.001

RECORD 98
TITLE
  Viral Load Kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in First Two Patients in Korea
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kim J.Y.;  Ko J.H.;  Kim Y.;  Kim Y.J.;  Kim J.M.;  Chung Y.S.;  Kim H.M.;  Han M.G.;  Kim S.Y.;  Chin B.S.
SOURCE
  Journal of Korean medical science (2020) 35:7 (e86). Date of Publication: 24 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  As of February 2020, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak started in China in December 2019 has been spreading in many countries in the world. With the numbers of confirmed cases are increasing, information on the epidemiologic investigation and clinical manifestation have been accumulated. However, data on viral load kinetics in confirmed cases are lacking. Here, we present the viral load kinetics of the first two confirmed patients with mild to moderate illnesses in Korea in whom distinct viral load kinetics are shown. This report suggests that viral load kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 may be different from that of previously reported other coronavirus infections such as SARS-CoV.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e86

RECORD 99
TITLE
  First case of 2019 novel coronavirus infection in children in Shanghai
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cai J.H.;  Wang X.S.;  Ge Y.L.;  Xia A.M.;  Chang H.L.;  Tian H.;  Zhu Y.X.;  Wang Q.R.;  Zeng J.S.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics (2020) 58:2 (86-87). Date of Publication: 2 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1310.2020.02.002

RECORD 100
TITLE
  Facing the pandemic of 2019 novel coronavirus infections: the pediatric perspectives
AUTHOR NAMES
  Fang F.;  Luo X.P.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics (2020) 58:2 (81-85). Date of Publication: 2 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1310.2020.02.001

RECORD 101
TITLE
  COVID-19, Australia: Epidemiology Report 5 (Reporting week ending 19:00 AEDT 29 February 2020)
SOURCE
  Communicable diseases intelligence (2018) (2020) 44. Date of Publication: 4 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  This is the fifth epidemiological report for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), reported in Australia as at 19:00 Australian Eastern Daylight Time [AEDT] 29 February 2020. It includes data on COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Australia, the international situation and a review of current evidence.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.33321/cdi.2020.44.20

RECORD 102
TITLE
  Recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and control of the 2019 novel coronavirus infection in children (first interim edition)
SOURCE
  Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics (2020) 58:3 (169-174). Date of Publication: 2 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1310.2020.03.001

RECORD 103
TITLE
  First case of severe childhood novel coronavirus pneumonia in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen F.;  Liu Z.S.;  Zhang F.R.;  Xiong R.H.;  Chen Y.;  Cheng X.F.;  Wang W.Y.;  Ren J.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics (2020) 58:3 (179-182). Date of Publication: 2 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1310.2020.03.003

RECORD 104
TITLE
  Diagnostic Utility of Clinical Laboratory Data Determinations for Patients with the Severe COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Gao Y.;  Li T.;  Han M.;  Li X.;  Wu D.;  Xu Y.;  Zhu Y.;  Liu Y.;  Wang X.;  Wang L.
SOURCE
  Journal of medical virology (2020). Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The role of clinical laboratory data in the differential diagnosis of the severe forms of COVID-19 has not been definitely established. The aim of this study was to look for the warning index in severe COVID-19 patients. We investigated forty-three adult patients with COVID-19. The patients were classified into mild group (28 patients) and severe group (15 patients). Comparison of the haematological parameters between the mild and severe groups showed significant differences in IL-6, D-Dimer, GLU, TT, FIB and CRP (P <0.05). The optimal threshold and area under the ROC curve of IL-6 were 24.3 pg/mL and 0.795 respectively, while those of D-Dimer were 0.28 µg/L and 0.750, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of IL-6 combined with D-Dimer was 0.840. The specificity of predicting the severity of COVID-19 during IL-6 and D-Dimer tandem testing was up to 93.3%, while the sensitivity of IL-6 and D-Dimer by parallel test in the severe COVID-19 was 96.4%. IL-6 and D-Dimer were closely related to the occurrence of severe COVID-19 in the adult patients, and their combined detection had the highest specificity and sensitivity for early prediction of the severity of COVID-19 patients, which has important clinical value. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25770

RECORD 105
TITLE
  Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and neonate: What neonatologist need to know
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lu Q.;  Shi Y.
SOURCE
  Journal of Medical Virology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) cause china epidemics with high morbidity and mortality, the infection has been transmitted to other countries. About three neonates and more than 230 children cases are reported. The disease condition of the main children was mild. There is currently no evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted transplacentally from mother to the newborn. The treatment strategy for children with Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is based on adult experience. Thus far, no deaths have been reported in the pediatric age group. This review describes the current understanding of COVID-19 infection in newborns and children.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25740

RECORD 106
TITLE
  Chest computed tomography in children with COVID-19 respiratory infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li W.;  Cui H.;  Li K.;  Fang Y.;  Li S.
SOURCE
  Pediatric Radiology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: Infection with COVID-19 is currently rare in children. Objective: To describe chest CT findings in children with COVID-19. Materials and methods: We studied children at a large tertiary-care hospital in China, during the period from 28 January 2019 to 8 February 2020, who had positive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for COVID-19. We recorded findings at any chest CT performed in the included children, along with core clinical observations. Results: We included five children from 10 months to 6 years of age (mean 3.4 years). All had had at least one CT scan after admission. Three of these five had CT abnormality on the first CT scan (at 2 days, 4 days and 9 days, respectively, after onset of symptoms) in the form of patchy ground-glass opacities; all normalised during treatment. Conclusion: Compared to reports in adults, we found similar but more modest lung abnormalities at CT in our small paediatric cohort.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-020-04656-7

RECORD 107
TITLE
  Anesthetic Management of Patients With Suspected or Confirmed 2019 Novel Coronavirus Infection During Emergency Procedures
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhao S.;  Ling K.;  Yan H.;  Zhong L.;  Peng X.;  Yao S.;  Huang J.;  Chen X.
SOURCE
  Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Objectives: The aim of the present study was to prevent cross-infection in the operating room during emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by following anesthesia management protocols, and to document clinical- and anesthesia-related characteristics of these patients. Design: This was a retrospective, multicenter clinical study. Setting: This study used a multicenter dataset from 4 hospitals in Wuhan, China. Participants: Patients and health care providers with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV from January 23 to 31, 2020, at the Wuhan Union Hospital, the Wuhan Children’s Hospital, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, and the Wuhan Fourth Hospital in Wuhan, China. Interventions: Anesthetic management and infection control guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with suspected 2019-nCoV were drafted and applied in 4 hospitals in Wuhan. Measurements and Main Results: Cross-infection in the operating rooms of the 4 hospitals was effectively reduced by implementing the new measures and procedures. The majority of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection or suspected infection were female (23 [62%] of 37), and the mean age was 41.0 years old (standard deviation 19.6; range 4-78). 10 (27%) patients had chronic medical illnesses, including 4 (11%) with diabetes, 8 (22%) with hypertension, and 8 (22%) with digestive system disease. Twenty-five (68%) patients presented with lymphopenia, and 23 (62%) patients exhibited multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on computed tomography scanning. Conclusions: The present study indicates that COVID 19–specific guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV may effectively prevent cross-infection in the operating room. Most patients with confirmed or suspected COVID 19 presented with fever and dry cough and demonstrated bilateral multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on chest computed tomography scans.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jvca.2020.02.039

RECORD 108
TITLE
  Arguments in favour of remdesivir for treating SARS-CoV-2 infections
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ko W.-C.;  Rolain J.-M.;  Lee N.-Y.;  Chen P.-L.;  Huang C.-T.;  Lee P.-I.;  Hsueh P.-R.
SOURCE
  International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents (2020) Article Number: 105933. Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2020.105933

RECORD 109
TITLE
  Analysis on epidemic situation and spatiotemporal changes of COVID-19 in Anhui
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu M.;  Xu H.L.;  Yuan M.;  Liu Z.R.;  Wu X.Y.;  Zhang Y.;  Ma L.Y.;  Gong L.;  Gan H.;  Zong W.W.;  Tao S.M.;  Liu Q.;  Du Y.N.;  Tao F.B.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua yu fang yi xue za zhi [Chinese journal of preventive medicine] (2020) 54 (E019). Date of Publication: 27 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  We used the epidemic data of COVID-19 published on the official website of the municipal health commission in Anhui province. We mapped the spatiotemporal changes of confirmed cases, fitted the epidemic situation by the population growth curve at different stages and took statistical description and analysis of the epidemic situation in Anhui province. It was found that the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 was 156/100 000 by February 18, 2020 and the trend of COVID-19 epidemic declined after February 7, changing from J curve to S curve. The actual number of new cases began to decrease from February 2 to February 4 due to the time of case report and actual onset delayed by 3 to 5 days.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.cn112150-20200221-00150

RECORD 110
TITLE
  Protocol for the development of a rapid advice guideline for prevention, management and care of children with 2019 novel coronavirus infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li W.;  Zhou Q.;  Tang Y.;  Ren L.;  Yu X.;  Li Q.;  Liu E.;  Chen Y.
SOURCE
  Annals of palliative medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/apm.2020.02.33

RECORD 111
TITLE
  Risk Factors Associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Death in Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pneumonia in Wuhan, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wu C.;  Chen X.;  Cai Y.;  Xia J.;  Zhou X.;  Xu S.;  Huang H.;  Zhang L.;  Zhou X.;  Du C.;  Zhang Y.;  Song J.;  Wang S.;  Chao Y.;  Yang Z.;  Xu J.;  Zhou X.;  Chen D.;  Xiong W.;  Xu L.;  Zhou F.;  Jiang J.;  Bai C.;  Zheng J.;  Song Y.
SOURCE
  JAMA Internal Medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Importance: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease that was first reported in Wuhan, China, and has subsequently spread worldwide. Risk factors for the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 pneumonia have not yet been well delineated. Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or died. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of 201 patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital in China between December 25, 2019, and January 26, 2020. The final date of follow-up was February 13, 2020. Exposures: Confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia. Main Outcomes and Measures: The development of ARDS and death. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory, management, treatment, and outcome data were also collected and analyzed. Results: Of 201 patients, the median age was 51 years (interquartile range, 43-60 years), and 128 (63.7%) patients were men. Eighty-four patients (41.8%) developed ARDS, and of those 84 patients, 44 (52.4%) died. In those who developed ARDS, compared with those who did not, more patients presented with dyspnea (50 of 84 [59.5%] patients and 30 of 117 [25.6%] patients, respectively [difference, 33.9%; 95% CI, 19.7%-48.1%]) and had comorbidities such as hypertension (23 of 84 [27.4%] patients and 16 of 117 [13.7%] patients, respectively [difference, 13.7%; 95% CI, 1.3%-26.1%]) and diabetes (16 of 84 [19.0%] patients and 6 of 117 [5.1%] patients, respectively [difference, 13.9%; 95% CI, 3.6%-24.2%]). In bivariate Cox regression analysis, risk factors associated with the development of ARDS and progression from ARDS to death included older age (hazard ratio [HR], 3.26; 95% CI 2.08-5.11; and HR, 6.17; 95% CI, 3.26-11.67, respectively), neutrophilia (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.09-1.19; and HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17, respectively), and organ and coagulation dysfunction (eg, higher lactate dehydrogenase [HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.44-1.79; and HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.11-1.52, respectively] and D-dimer [HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; and HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04, respectively]). High fever (≥39 °C) was associated with higher likelihood of ARDS development (HR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.11-2.84) and lower likelihood of death (HR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82). Among patients with ARDS, treatment with methylprednisolone decreased the risk of death (HR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.20-0.72). Conclusions and Relevance: Older age was associated with greater risk of development of ARDS and death likely owing to less rigorous immune response. Although high fever was associated with the development of ARDS, it was also associated with better outcomes among patients with ARDS. Moreover, treatment with methylprednisolone may be beneficial for patients who develop ARDS.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0994

RECORD 112
TITLE
  A case report of neonatal COVID-19 infection in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang S.;  Guo L.;  Chen L.;  Liu W.;  Cao Y.;  Zhang J.;  Feng L.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 12 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  In December 2019, the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 emerged in China and now has spread in many countries. Pregnant women are susceptible population of COVID-19 which are more likely to have complications and even progresse to severe illness. We report a case of neonatal COVID-19 infection in China with pharyngeal swabs tested positive by rRT-PCR assay 36 hours after birth. However, whether the case is a vertical transmission from mother to child remains to be confirmed.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa225

RECORD 113
TITLE
  Detection of Covid-19 in Children in Early January 2020 in Wuhan, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu W.;  Zhang Q.;  Chen J.;  Xiang R.;  Song H.;  Shu S.;  Chen L.;  Liang L.;  Zhou J.;  You L.;  Wu P.;  Zhang B.;  Lu Y.;  Xia L.;  Huang L.;  Yang Y.;  Liu F.;  Semple M.G.;  Cowling B.J.;  Lan K.;  Sun Z.;  Yu H.;  Liu Y.
SOURCE
  The New England journal of medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 12 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMc2003717

RECORD 114
TITLE
  Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Pregnancy: What obstetricians need to know
AUTHOR NAMES
  Rasmussen S.A.;  Smulian J.C.;  Lednicky J.A.;  Wen T.S.;  Jamieson D.J.
SOURCE
  American journal of obstetrics and gynecology (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging disease with a rapid increase in cases and deaths since its first identification in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Limited data are available about COVID-19 during pregnancy; however, information on illnesses associated with other highly pathogenic coronaviruses (i.e., severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)) might provide insights into COVID-19’s effects during pregnancy.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2020.02.017

RECORD 115
TITLE
  Healing the schism between public health and medicine, promoting the integration of prevention and treatment
AUTHOR NAMES
  Tao F.B.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua yu fang yi xue za zhi [Chinese journal of preventive medicine] (2020) 54 (E024). Date of Publication: 8 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The ‘Healing the Schism: Epidemiology, Medicine, and the Public’s Health’ by professor Kerr L. White’s be published has a history of nearly 30 years. Since then, although scholars have appealed to incorporating public health and clinical medicine education, and breaking down separations between public health and clinical workforce in China, the effect is yet not so obvious. The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has opened a public class on the treatment, prevention and control of infectious diseases for the Chinese citizens. Consequently, the Chinese people have higher expectations on the modernization of public health governance, and the social atmosphere of incorporating preventive medicine and clinical medical education is establishing. In future, when combating with novel infectious diseases and public health emergencies, the response capacity of public health system and treatment capacity of clinical system will be significantly improved, while the situation on insufficient integration of prevention and treatment is bound to be reversed.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.cn112150-20200304-00246

RECORD 116
TITLE
  Clinical characteristics of 24 asymptomatic infections with COVID-19 screened among close contacts in Nanjing, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Hu Z.;  Song C.;  Xu C.;  Jin G.;  Chen Y.;  Xu X.;  Ma H.;  Chen W.;  Lin Y.;  Zheng Y.;  Wang J.;  Hu Z.;  Yi Y.;  Shen H.
SOURCE
  Science China. Life sciences (2020). Date of Publication: 4 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Previous studies have showed clinical characteristics of patients with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the evidence of person-to-person transmission. Limited data are available for asymptomatic infections. This study aims to present the clinical characteristics of 24 cases with asymptomatic infection screened from close contacts and to show the transmission potential of asymptomatic COVID-19 virus carriers. Epidemiological investigations were conducted among all close contacts of COVID-19 patients (or suspected patients) in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China, from Jan 28 to Feb 9, 2020, both in clinic and in community. Asymptomatic carriers were laboratory-confirmed positive for the COVID-19 virus by testing the nucleic acid of the pharyngeal swab samples. Their clinical records, laboratory assessments, and chest CT scans were reviewed. As a result, none of the 24 asymptomatic cases presented any obvious symptoms while nucleic acid screening. Five cases (20.8%) developed symptoms (fever, cough, fatigue, etc.) during hospitalization. Twelve (50.0%) cases showed typical CT images of ground-glass chest and 5 (20.8%) presented stripe shadowing in the lungs. The remaining 7 (29.2%) cases showed normal CT image and had no symptoms during hospitalization. These 7 cases were younger (median age: 14.0 years; P=0.012) than the rest. None of the 24 cases developed severe COVID-19 pneumonia or died. The median communicable period, defined as the interval from the first day of positive nucleic acid tests to the first day of continuous negative tests, was 9.5 days (up to 21 days among the 24 asymptomatic cases). Through epidemiological investigation, we observed a typical asymptomatic transmission to the cohabiting family members, which even caused severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Overall, the asymptomatic carriers identified from close contacts were prone to be mildly ill during hospitalization. However, the communicable period could be up to three weeks and the communicated patients could develop severe illness. These results highlighted the importance of close contact tracing and longitudinally surveillance via virus nucleic acid tests. Further isolation recommendation and continuous nucleic acid tests may also be recommended to the patients discharged.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11427-020-1661-4

RECORD 117
TITLE
  Clinical and CT features in pediatric patients with COVID-19 infection: Different points from adults
AUTHOR NAMES
  Xia W.;  Shao J.;  Guo Y.;  Peng X.;  Li Z.;  Hu D.
SOURCE
  Pediatric Pulmonology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Purpose: To discuss the different characteristics of clinical, laboratory, and chest computed tomography (CT) in pediatric patients from adults with 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection. Methods: The clinical, laboratory, and chest CT features of 20 pediatric inpatients with COVID-19 infection confirmed by pharyngeal swab COVID-19 nucleic acid test were retrospectively analyzed during 23 January and 8 February 2020. The clinical and laboratory information was obtained from inpatient records. All the patients were undergone chest CT in our hospital. Results: Thirteen pediatric patients (13/20, 65%) had an identified history of close contact with COVID-19 diagnosed family members. Fever (12/20, 60%) and cough (13/20, 65%) were the most common symptoms. For laboratory findings, procalcitonin elevation (16/20, 80%) should be pay attention to, which is not common in adults. Coinfection (8/20, 40%) is common in pediatric patients. A total of 6 patients presented with unilateral pulmonary lesions (6/20, 30%), 10 with bilateral pulmonary lesions (10/20, 50%), and 4 cases showed no abnormality on chest CT (4/20, 20%). Consolidation with surrounding halo sign was observed in 10 patients (10/20, 50%), ground-glass opacities were observed in 12 patients (12/20, 60%), fine mesh shadow was observed in 4 patients (4/20, 20%), and tiny nodules were observed in 3 patients (3/20, 15%). Conclusion: Procalcitonin elevation and consolidation with surrounding halo signs were common in pediatric patients which were different from adults. It is suggested that underlying coinfection may be more common in pediatrics, and the consolidation with surrounding halo sign which is considered as a typical sign in pediatric patients.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.24718

RECORD 118
TITLE
  Detection of Novel Coronavirus by RT-PCR in Stool Specimen from Asymptomatic Child, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Tang A.;  Tong Z.-D.;  Wang H.-L.;  Dai Y.-X.;  Li K.-F.;  Liu J.-N.;  Wu W.-J.;  Yuan C.;  Yu M.-L.;  Li P.;  Yan J.-B.
SOURCE
  Emerging infectious diseases (2020) 26:6. Date of Publication: 17 Jun 2020
ABSTRACT
  We report an asymptomatic child who was positive for a 2019 novel coronavirus by reverse transcription PCR in a stool specimen 17 days after the last virus exposure. The child was virus positive in stool specimens for at least an additional 9 days. Respiratory tract specimens were negative by reverse transcription PCR.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2606.200301

RECORD 119
TITLE
  COVID-19 with post-chemotherapy agranulocytosis in childhood acute leukemia: a case report
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen Z.;  Xiong H.;  Li J.X.;  Li H.;  Tao F.;  Yang Y.T.;  Wu B.;  Tang W.;  Teng J.X.;  Fu Q.;  Yang L.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua xue ye xue za zhi = Zhonghua xueyexue zazhi (2020) 41 (E004). Date of Publication: 9 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0253-2727.2020.0004

RECORD 120
TITLE
  The SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Pipeline: an Overview
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen W.-H.;  Strych U.;  Hotez P.J.;  Bottazzi M.E.
SOURCE
  Current Tropical Medicine Reports (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Purpose of Review: The goal of this review is to provide a timely overview on efforts to develop a vaccine for the 2019 novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Recent Findings: Previous research efforts to develop a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) vaccine in the years following the 2003 pandemic have opened the door for investigators to design vaccine concepts and approaches for the COVID-19 epidemic in China. Both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 exhibit a high degree of genetic similarity and bind to the same host cell ACE2 receptor. Based on previous experience with SARS-CoV vaccines, it is expected that all COVID-19 vaccines will require careful safety evaluations for immunopotentiation that could lead to increased infectivity or eosinophilic infiltration. Besides this, a COVID-19 vaccine target product profile must address vaccinating at-risk human populations including frontline healthcare workers, individuals over the age of 60, and those with underlying and debilitating chronic conditions. Among the vaccine technologies under evaluation are whole virus vaccines, recombinant protein subunit vaccines, and nucleic acid vaccines. Summary: Each current vaccine strategy has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, it is paramount that multiple strategies be advanced quickly and then evaluated for safety and efficacy. Ultimately, the safety studies to minimize undesired immunopotentiation will become the most significant bottleneck in terms of time.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40475-020-00201-6

RECORD 121
TITLE
  Transmission potential of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) onboard the diamond Princess Cruises Ship, 2020
AUTHOR NAMES
  Mizumoto K.;  Chowell G.
SOURCE
  Infectious Disease Modelling (2020) 5 (264-270). Date of Publication: 1 Jan 2020
ABSTRACT
  An outbreak of COVID-19 developed aboard the Princess Cruises Ship during January–February 2020. Using mathematical modeling and time-series incidence data describing the trajectory of the outbreak among passengers and crew members, we characterize how the transmission potential varied over the course of the outbreak. Our estimate of the mean reproduction number in the confined setting reached values as high as ~11, which is higher than mean estimates reported from community-level transmission dynamics in China and Singapore (approximate range: 1.1–7). Our findings suggest that Rt decreased substantially compared to values during the early phase after the Japanese government implemented an enhanced quarantine control. Most recent estimates of Rt reached values largely below the epidemic threshold, indicating that a secondary outbreak of the novel coronavirus was unlikely to occur aboard the Diamond Princess Ship.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.idm.2020.02.003

RECORD 122
TITLE
  Lack of Vertical Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li Y.;  Zhao R.;  Zheng S.;  Chen X.;  Wang J.;  Sheng X.;  Zhou J.;  Cai H.;  Fang Q.;  Yu F.;  Fan J.;  Xu K.;  Chen Y.;  Sheng J.
SOURCE
  Emerging infectious diseases (2020) 26:6. Date of Publication: 17 Jun 2020
ABSTRACT
  A woman with 2019 novel coronavirus disease in her 35th week of pregnancy delivered an infant by cesarean section in a negative-pressure operating room. The infant was negative for severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2. This case suggests that mother-to-child transmission is unlikely for this virus.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2606.200287

RECORD 123
TITLE
  Response to COVID-19 in Taiwan: Big Data Analytics, New Technology, and Proactive Testing
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang C.J.;  Ng C.Y.;  Brook R.H.
SOURCE
  JAMA – Journal of the American Medical Association (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.3151

RECORD 124
TITLE
  Are children less susceptible to COVID-19?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lee P.-I.;  Hu Y.-L.;  Chen P.-Y.;  Huang Y.-C.;  Hsueh P.-R.
SOURCE
  Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.02.011

RECORD 125
TITLE
  2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Taiwan: Reports of two cases from Wuhan, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Huang W.-H.;  Teng L.-C.;  Yeh T.-K.;  Chen Y.-J.;  Lo W.-J.;  Wu M.-J.;  Chin C.-S.;  Tsan Y.-T.;  Lin T.-C.;  Chai J.-W.;  Lin C.-F.;  Tseng C.-H.;  Liu C.-W.;  Wu C.-M.;  Chen P.-Y.;  Shi Z.-Y.;  Liu P.-Y.
SOURCE
  Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  We reported two cases with community-acquired pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) who returned from Wuhan, China in January, 2020. The reported cases highlight non-specific clinical presentations of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as well as the importance of rapid laboratory-based diagnosis.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.02.009

RECORD 126
TITLE
  2019 Novel coronavirus: where we are and what we know
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cheng Z.J.;  Shan J.
SOURCE
  Infection (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  There is a current worldwide outbreak of a new type of coronavirus (2019-nCoV), which originated from Wuhan in China and has now spread to 17 other countries. Governments are under increased pressure to stop the outbreak spiraling into a global health emergency. At this stage, preparedness, transparency, and sharing of information are crucial to risk assessments and beginning outbreak control activities. This information should include reports from outbreak sites and from laboratories supporting the investigation. This paper aggregates and consolidates the virology, epidemiology, clinical management strategies from both English and Chinese literature, official news channels, and other official government documents. In addition, by fitting the number of infections with a single-term exponential model, we report that the infection is spreading at an exponential rate, with a doubling period of 1.8 days.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s15010-020-01401-y