Neuroscience

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RECORD 1
TITLE
  Health psychology and the coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic: A call for research
AUTHOR NAMES
  Arden M.A.;  Chilcot J.
SOURCE
  British journal of health psychology (2020). Date of Publication: 30 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12414

RECORD 2
TITLE
  Reflections on Nursing Ingenuity During the COVID-19 Pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Newby J.C.;  Mabry M.C.;  Carlisle B.A.;  Olson D.M.;  Lane B.E.
SOURCE
  The Journal of neuroscience nursing : journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (2020). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  INTRODUCTION: This reflections article provides insight toward nursing innovations to reduce the overuse of personal protective equipment while maintaining a safe environment for staff taking care of COVID-19 patients. The secondary aim of this paper to capitalize on recent advances in mass electronic communication through social media to encourage nurses across the globe to share their knowledge and expertise during this pandemic.The many innovations that have been implemented fall into 3 categories of: reducing unnecessary use of personal protective equipment (PPE), promoting staff safety and readiness, and reducing foot traffic. SUMMARY: These strategies are being shared to promote dissemination of innovative nursing interventions that will save lives during the COVID-19 pandemic.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JNN.0000000000000525

RECORD 3
TITLE
  The human rights of children with disabilities during health emergencies: the challenge of COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Schiariti V.
SOURCE
  Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14526

RECORD 4
TITLE
  Neurosurgery during the COVID-19 pandemic: update from Lombardy, northern Italy
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zoia C.;  Bongetta D.;  Veiceschi P.;  Cenzato M.;  Di Meco F.;  Locatelli D.;  Boeris D.;  Fontanella M.M.
SOURCE
  Acta neurochirurgica (2020). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-020-04305-w

RECORD 5
TITLE
  Chronic kidney disease is associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Henry B.M.;  Lippi G.
SOURCE
  International Urology and Nephrology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-020-02451-9

RECORD 6
TITLE
  Cardiac troponin I in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): Evidence from a meta-analysis
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Lavie C.J.;  Sanchis-Gomar F.
SOURCE
  Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2020.03.001

RECORD 7
TITLE
  Active smoking is not associated with severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Henry B.M.
SOURCE
  European Journal of Internal Medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2020.03.014

RECORD 8
TITLE
  Expert consensus on the management strategy of patients with hereditary ataxia during prevention and control of novel coronavirus pneumonia epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Specialized Committee Of Neurogenetics Neurophysician Branch Of Chinese Medical Doctor Association ;  Jiang H.;  Tang B.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua yi xue yi chuan xue za zhi = Zhonghua yixue yichuanxue zazhi = Chinese journal of medical genetics (2020) 37:4 (359-366). Date of Publication: 10 Apr 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, a series of highly infectious cases of unexplained pneumonia have been discovered in Wuhan, Hubei Province, which have been confirmed as ‘2019 corona virus disease’ caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). SARS-CoV-2 virus can invade many human systems including the lungs. Patients with central nervous system involvement may show a series of neurological symptoms, which is easy to be misdiagnosed and neglected, thereby increasing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission. Hereditary ataxia is a large group of neurodegenerative diseases with great clinical and genetic heterogeneity and high mortality and disability. In view of the seriousness of the COVID-19 epidemic, a series of prevention and control measures adopted by the government have restricted the follow-up, diagnosis and treatment of patients by the hospitals, which has a great impact on their mental and physical health. In order to standardize the management of patients during the prevention and control of COVID-19 epidemic, the Specialized Committee of Neurogenetics of the Neurophysician Branch of Chinese Medical Doctor Association has formulated this consensus, with an aim to help patients to overcome the difficulties and pass the epidemic prevention period safely.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.1003-9406.2020.04.001

RECORD 9
TITLE
  Patients with mental health disorders in the COVID-19 epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yao H.;  Chen J.-H.;  Xu Y.-F.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e21). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30090-0

RECORD 10
TITLE
  Thrombocytopenia is associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections: A meta-analysis
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Plebani M.;  Henry B.M.
SOURCE
  Clinica Chimica Acta (2020) 506 (145-148). Date of Publication: 1 Jul 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel infectious disease with lack of established laboratory markers available to evaluate illness severity. In this study, we investigate whether platelet count could differentiate between COVID-19 patients with or without severe disease. Additionally, we evaluate if thrombocytopenia is associated with severe COVID-19. Methods: An electronic search in Medline, Scopus and Web of Science was performed to identify studies reporting data on platelet count in COVID-19 patients. A meta-analysis was performed, with calculation of weighted mean difference (WMD) of platelet number in COVID-19 patients with or without severe disease and odds ratio (OR) of thrombocytopenia for severe form of COVID-19. Results: Nine studies with 1779 COVID-19 patients, 399 (22.4%) with severe disease, were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis revealed that platelet count was significantly lower in patients with more severe COVID-19 (WMD −31 × 109/L; 95% CI, from −35 to −29 × 109/L). A subgroup analysis comparing patients by survival, found an even lower platelet count was observed with mortality (WMD, −48 × 109/L; 95% CI, −57 to −39 × 109/L. In the four studies (n = 1427) which reported data on rate of thrombocytopenia, a low platelet count was associated with over fivefold enhanced risk of severe COVID-19 (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.8–14.6). Conclusions: Low platelet count is associated with increased risk of severe disease and mortality in patients with COVID-19, and thus should serve as clinical indicator of worsening illness during hospitalization.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2020.03.022

RECORD 11
TITLE
  Emergency Caesarean delivery in a patient with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 under spinal anaesthesia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Xia H.;  Zhao S.;  Wu Z.;  Luo H.;  Zhou C.;  Chen X.
SOURCE
  British Journal of Anaesthesia (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bja.2020.02.016

RECORD 12
TITLE
  Laboratory abnormalities in patients with COVID-2019 infection
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Plebani M.
SOURCE
  Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2020-0198

RECORD 13
TITLE
  Clinical features of severe pediatric patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in Wuhan: a single center’s observational study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sun D.;  Li H.;  Lu X.-X.;  Xiao H.;  Ren J.;  Zhang F.-R.;  Liu Z.-S.
SOURCE
  World journal of pediatrics : WJP (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 was first detected in Wuhan, Hubei, China. People of all ages are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. No information on severe pediatric patients with COVID-19 has been reported. We aimed to describe the clinical features of severe pediatric patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We included eight severe or critically ill patients with COVID-19 who were treated at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Wuhan Children’s Hospital from January 24 to February 24. We collected information including demographic data, symptoms, imaging data, laboratory findings, treatments and clinical outcomes of the patients with severe COVID-19. RESULTS: The onset age of the eight patients ranged from 2 months to 15 years; six were boys. The most common symptoms were polypnea (8/8), followed by fever (6/8) and cough (6/8). Chest imaging showed multiple patch-like shadows in seven patients and ground-glass opacity in six. Laboratory findings revealed normal or increased whole blood counts (7/8), increased C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and lactate dehydrogenase (6/8), and abnormal liver function (4/8). Other findings included decreased CD16 + CD56 (4/8) and Th/Ts*(1/8), increased CD3 (2/8), CD4 (4/8) and CD8 (1/8), IL-6 (2/8), IL-10 (5/8) and IFN-γ (2/8). Treatment modalities were focused on symptomatic and respiratory support. Two critically ill patients underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Up to February 24, 2020, three patients remained under treatment in ICU, the other five recovered and were discharged home. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of severe pediatric patients in Wuhan, polypnea was the most common symptom, followed by fever and cough. Common imaging changes included multiple patch-like shadows and ground-glass opacity; and a cytokine storm was found in these patients, which appeared more serious in critically ill patients.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12519-020-00354-4

RECORD 14
TITLE
  The critical role of laboratory medicine during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and other viral outbreaks
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Plebani M.
SOURCE
  Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated to COVID-19 and sustained by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is the latest biological hazard to assume the relevance of insidious worldwide threat. One obvious question that is now engaging the minds of many scientists and healthcare professionals is whether and eventually how laboratory medicine could efficiently contribute to counteract this and other (future) viral outbreaks. Despite there being evidence that laboratory tests are vital throughout many clinical pathways, there are at least three major areas where in vitro diagnostics can also provide essential contributions to diagnostic reasoning and managed care of patients with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. These include etiological diagnosis, patient monitoring, as well as epidemiologic surveillance. Nonetheless, some structural and practical aspects may generate substantial hurdles in providing timely and efficient response to this infectious emergency, which basically include inadequate (insufficient) environment and shortage of technical and human resources for facing enhanced volume of tests on many infected patients, some of whom are with severe disease. Some proactive and reactive strategies may hence be identified to confront this serious healthcare challenge, which entail major investments on conventional laboratory resources, reinforcement of regional networks of clinical laboratories, installation of mobile laboratories, as well as being proactive in establishing laboratory emergency plans.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2020-0240

RECORD 15
TITLE
  Laboratory abnormalities in children with novel coronavirus disease 2019
AUTHOR NAMES
  Henry B.M.;  Lippi G.;  Plebani M.
SOURCE
  Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 16 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2020-0272

RECORD 16
TITLE
  Potential preanalytical and analytical vulnerabilities in the laboratory diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Simundic A.-M.;  Plebani M.
SOURCE
  Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 16 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  A novel zoonotic coronavirus outbreak is spreading all over the world. This pandemic disease has now been defined as novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and is sustained by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). As the current gold standard for the etiological diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is (real time) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) on respiratory tract specimens, the diagnostic accuracy of this technique shall be considered a foremost prerequisite. Overall, potential RT-PCR vulnerabilities include general preanalytical issues such as identification problems, inadequate procedures for collection, handling, transport and storage of the swabs, collection of inappropriate or inadequate material (for quality or volume), presence of interfering substances, manual errors, as well as specific aspects such as sample contamination and testing patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Some analytical problems may also contribute to jeopardize the diagnostic accuracy, including testing outside the diagnostic window, active viral recombination, use of inadequately validated assays, insufficient harmonization, instrument malfunctioning, along with other specific technical issues. Some practical indications can hence be identified for minimizing the risk of diagnostic errors, encompassing the improvement of diagnostic accuracy by combining clinical evidence with results of chest computed tomography (CT) and RT-PCR, interpretation of RT-PCR results according to epidemiologic, clinical and radiological factors, recollection and testing of upper (or lower) respiratory specimens in patients with negative RT-PCR test results and high suspicion or probability of infection, dissemination of clear instructions for specimen (especially swab) collection, management and storage, together with refinement of molecular target(s) and thorough compliance with analytical procedures, including quality assurance.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2020-0285

RECORD 17
TITLE
  Immediate psychological responses and associated factors during the initial stage of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic among the general population in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang C.;  Pan R.;  Wan X.;  Tan Y.;  Xu L.;  Ho C.S.;  Ho R.C.
SOURCE
  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020) 17:5 Article Number: 1729. Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic is a public health emergency of international concern and poses a challenge to psychological resilience. Research data are needed to develop evidence-driven strategies to reduce adverse psychological impacts and psychiatric symptoms during the epidemic. The aim of this study was to survey the general public in China to better understand their levels of psychological impact, anxiety, depression, and stress during the initial stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. The data will be used for future reference. Methods: From 31 January to 2 February 2020, we conducted an online survey using snowball sampling techniques. The online survey collected information on demographic data, physical symptoms in the past 14 days, contact history with COVID-19, knowledge and concerns about COVID-19, precautionary measures against COVID-19, and additional information required with respect to COVID-19. Psychological impact was assessed by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and mental health status was assessed by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Results: This study included 1210 respondents from 194 cities in China. In total, 53.8% of respondents rated the psychological impact of the outbreak as moderate or severe; 16.5% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms; 28.8% reported moderate to severe anxiety symptoms; and 8.1% reported moderate to severe stress levels. Most respondents spent 20–24 h per day at home (84.7%); were worried about their family members contracting COVID-19 (75.2%); and were satisfied with the amount of health information available (75.1%). Female gender, student status, specific physical symptoms (e.g., myalgia, dizziness, coryza), and poor self-rated health status were significantly associated with a greater psychological impact of the outbreak and higher levels of stress, anxiety, and depression (p < 0.05). Specific up-to-date and accurate health information (e.g., treatment, local outbreak situation) and particular precautionary measures (e.g., hand hygiene, wearing a mask) were associated with a lower psychological impact of the outbreak and lower levels of stress, anxiety, and depression (p < 0.05). Conclusions: During the initial phase of the COVID-19 outbreak in China, more than half of the respondents rated the psychological impact as moderate-to-severe, and about one-third reported moderate-to-severe anxiety. Our findings identify factors associated with a lower level of psychological impact and better mental health status that can be used to formulate psychological interventions to improve the mental health of vulnerable groups during the COVID-19 epidemic.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051729

RECORD 18
TITLE
  Dysregulation of immune response in patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Qin C.;  Zhou L.;  Hu Z.;  Zhang S.;  Yang S.;  Tao Y.;  Xie C.;  Ma K.;  Shang K.;  Wang W.;  Tian D.-S.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 12 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: In December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout China. METHODS: Demographic and clinical data of all confirmed cases with COVID-19 on admission at Tongji Hospital from January 10 to February 12, 2020, were collected and analyzed. The data of laboratory examinations, including peripheral lymphocyte subsets, were analyzed and compared between severe and non-severe patients. RESULTS: Of the 452 patients with COVID-19 recruited, 286 were diagnosed as severe infection. The median age was 58 years and 235 were male. The most common symptoms were fever, shortness of breath, expectoration, fatigue, dry cough and myalgia. Severe cases tend to have lower lymphocytes counts, higher leukocytes counts and neutrophil-lymphocyte-ratio (NLR), as well as lower percentages of monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. Most of severe cases demonstrated elevated levels of infection-related biomarkers and inflammatory cytokines. The number of T cells significantly decreased, and more hampered in severe cases. Both helper T cells and suppressor T cells in patients with COVID-19 were below normal levels, and lower level of helper T cells in severe group. The percentage of naïve helper T cells increased and memory helper T cells decreased in severe cases. Patients with COVID-19 also have lower level of regulatory T cells, and more obviously damaged in severe cases. CONCLUSIONS: The novel coronavirus might mainly act on lymphocytes, especially T lymphocytes. Surveillance of NLR and lymphocyte subsets is helpful in the early screening of critical illness, diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa248

RECORD 19
TITLE
  Procalcitonin in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): A meta-analysis
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lippi G.;  Plebani M.
SOURCE
  Clinica Chimica Acta (2020) 505 (190-191). Date of Publication: 1 Jun 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2020.03.004

RECORD 20
TITLE
  Vicarious traumatization in the general public, members, and non-members of medical teams aiding in COVID-19 control
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li Z.;  Ge J.;  Yang M.;  Feng J.;  Qiao M.;  Jiang R.;  Bi J.;  Zhan G.;  Xu X.;  Wang L.;  Zhou Q.;  Zhou C.;  Pan Y.;  Liu S.;  Zhang H.;  Yang J.;  Zhu B.;  Hu Y.;  Hashimoto K.;  Jia Y.;  Wang H.;  Wang R.;  Liu C.;  Yang C.
SOURCE
  Brain, Behavior, and Immunity (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, more than 79,000 people have been diagnosed with infection of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). A large number of medical staff was sent to Wuhan city and Hubei province to aid COVID-19 control. Psychological stress, especially vicarious traumatization caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, should not be ignored. To address this concern, the study employed a total of 214 general public and 526 nurses (i.e., 234 front-line nurses and 292 non-front-line nurses) to evaluate vicarious traumatization scores via a mobile app-based questionnaire. Front-line nurses are engaged in the process of providing care for patients with COVID-19. The results showed that the vicarious traumatization scores for front-line nurses including scores for physiological and psychological responses, were significantly lower than those of non-front-line nurses (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the vicarious traumatization scores of the general public were significantly higher than those of the front-line nurses (P < 0.001); however, no statistical difference was observed compared to the scores of non-front-line nurses (P > 0.05). Therefore, increased attention should be paid to the psychological problems of the medical staff, especially non-front-line nurses, and general public under the situation of the spread and control of COVID-19. Early strategies that aim to prevent and treat vicarious traumatization in medical staff and general public are extremely necessary.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.03.007

RECORD 21
TITLE
  The epidemiology and pathogenesis of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Rothan H.A.;  Byrareddy S.N.
SOURCE
  Journal of Autoimmunity (2020) Article Number: 102433. Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by SARS-COV2 and represents the causative agent of a potentially fatal disease that is of great global public health concern. Based on the large number of infected people that were exposed to the wet animal market in Wuhan City, China, it is suggested that this is likely the zoonotic origin of COVID-19. Person-to-person transmission of COVID-19 infection led to the isolation of patients that were subsequently administered a variety of treatments. Extensive measures to reduce person-to-person transmission of COVID-19 have been implemented to control the current outbreak. Special attention and efforts to protect or reduce transmission should be applied in susceptible populations including children, health care providers, and elderly people. In this review, we highlights the symptoms, epidemiology, transmission, pathogenesis, phylogenetic analysis and future directions to control the spread of this fatal disease.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaut.2020.102433

RECORD 22
TITLE
  Preparedness and vulnerability of African countries against importations of COVID-19: a modelling study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Gilbert M.;  Pullano G.;  Pinotti F.;  Valdano E.;  Poletto C.;  Boëlle P.-Y.;  D’Ortenzio E.;  Yazdanpanah Y.;  Eholie S.P.;  Altmann M.;  Gutierrez B.;  Kraemer M.U.G.;  Colizza V.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10227 (871-877). Date of Publication: 14 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has spread from China to 25 countries. Local cycles of transmission have already occurred in 12 countries after case importation. In Africa, Egypt has so far confirmed one case. The management and control of COVID-19 importations heavily rely on a country’s health capacity. Here we evaluate the preparedness and vulnerability of African countries against their risk of importation of COVID-19. Methods: We used data on the volume of air travel departing from airports in the infected provinces in China and directed to Africa to estimate the risk of importation per country. We determined the country’s capacity to detect and respond to cases with two indicators: preparedness, using the WHO International Health Regulations Monitoring and Evaluation Framework; and vulnerability, using the Infectious Disease Vulnerability Index. Countries were clustered according to the Chinese regions contributing most to their risk. Findings: Countries with the highest importation risk (ie, Egypt, Algeria, and South Africa) have moderate to high capacity to respond to outbreaks. Countries at moderate risk (ie, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Angola, Tanzania, Ghana, and Kenya) have variable capacity and high vulnerability. We identified three clusters of countries that share the same exposure to the risk originating from the provinces of Guangdong, Fujian, and the city of Beijing, respectively. Interpretation: Many countries in Africa are stepping up their preparedness to detect and cope with COVID-19 importations. Resources, intensified surveillance, and capacity building should be urgently prioritised in countries with moderate risk that might be ill-prepared to detect imported cases and to limit onward transmission. Funding: EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Horizon 2020, Agence Nationale de la Recherche.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30411-6

RECORD 23
TITLE
  Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) early-stage importation risk to Europe, January 2020
AUTHOR NAMES
  Pullano G.;  Pinotti F.;  Valdano E.;  Boëlle P.-Y.;  Poletto C.;  Colizza V.
SOURCE
  Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin (2020) 25:4. Date of Publication: 1 Jan 2020
ABSTRACT
  As at 27 January 2020, 42 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) cases were confirmed outside China. We estimate the risk of case importation to Europe from affected areas in China via air travel. We consider travel restrictions in place, three reported cases in France, one in Germany. Estimated risk in Europe remains high. The United Kingdom, Germany and France are at highest risk. Importation from Beijing and Shanghai would lead to higher and widespread risk for Europe.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.4.2000057