Mental Health

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RECORD 1
TITLE
  The psychological impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on college students in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cao W.;  Fang Z.;  Hou G.;  Han M.;  Xu X.;  Dong J.;  Zheng J.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry Research (2020) 287 Article Number: 112934. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  A COVID-19 epidemic has been spreading in China and other parts of the world since December 2019. The epidemic has brought not only the risk of death from infection but also unbearable psychological pressure. We sampled college students from Changzhi medical college by using cluster sampling. They responded to a questionnaire packet that included the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and those inquiring the participants’ basic information. We received 7,143 responses. Results indicated that 0.9% of the respondents were experiencing severe anxiety, 2.7% moderate anxiety, and 21.3% mild anxiety. Moreover, living in urban areas (OR = 0.810, 95% CI = 0.709 – 0.925), family income stability (OR = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.645 – 0.817) and living with parents (OR = 0.752, 95% CI = 0.596 – 0.950) were protective factors against anxiety. Moreover, having relatives or acquaintances infected with COVID-19 was a risk factor for increasing the anxiety of college students (OR = 3.007, 95% CI = 2.377 – 3.804). Results of correlation analysis indicated that economic effects, and effects on daily life, as well as delays in academic activities, were positively associated with anxiety symptoms (P <.001). However, social support was negatively correlated with the level of anxiety (P <.001). It is suggested that the mental health of college students should be monitored during epidemics.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112934

RECORD 2
TITLE
  Health psychology and the coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic: A call for research
AUTHOR NAMES
  Arden M.A.;  Chilcot J.
SOURCE
  British journal of health psychology (2020). Date of Publication: 30 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12414

RECORD 3
TITLE
  Study on the public psychological states and its related factors during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in some regions of China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang Y.;  Di Y.;  Ye J.;  Wei W.
SOURCE
  Psychology, health & medicine (2020) (1-10). Date of Publication: 30 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: As COVID-19 occurs suddenly and is highly contagious, this will inevitably cause people anxiety, depression, etc. The study on the public psychological states and its related factors during the COVID-19 outbreak is of practical significance.Methods: 600 valid questionnaires were received. The Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used.Results: Females’ anxiety risk was 3.01 times compared to males (95% CI 1.39-6.52). Compared with people below 40 years old, the anxiety risk of people above 40 years old was 0.40 times (95% CI 0.16-0.99). SDS results indicated that the difference between education level and occupation was statistically significant (p = 0.024, 0.005). Compared to people with a master’s degree or above, those with a bachelor’s degree group had a depression risk of 0.39 times (95% CI 0.17-0.87). Compared with professionals, industrial service workers and other staff had a depression risk of 0.31 times (95% CI 0.15-0.65) and 0.38 times (95% CI 0.15-0.93).Conclusions: 600 questionnaire participants were psychologically stable. Non-anxiety and non-depression rates were 93.67% and 82.83%, respectively. There were anxiety in 6.33% and depression in 17.17%. Therefore, we should pay attention to the psychological states of the public.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2020.1746817

RECORD 4
TITLE
  Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards COVID-19 among Chinese residents during the rapid rise period of the COVID-19 outbreak: a quick online cross-sectional survey
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhong B.-L.;  Luo W.;  Li H.-M.;  Zhang Q.-Q.;  Liu X.-G.;  Li W.-T.;  Li Y.
SOURCE
  International journal of biological sciences (2020) 16:10 (1745-1752). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Unprecedented measures have been adopted to control the rapid spread of the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic in China. People’s adherence to control measures is affected by their knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards COVID-19. In this study, we investigated Chinese residents’ KAP towards COVID-19 during the rapid rise period of the outbreak. An online sample of Chinese residents was successfully recruited via the authors’ networks with residents and popular media in Hubei, China. A self-developed online KAP questionnaire was completed by the participants. The knowledge questionnaire consisted of 12 questions regarding the clinical characteristics and prevention of COVID-19. Assessments on residents’ attitudes and practices towards COVID-19 included questions on confidence in winning the battle against COVID-19 and wearing masks when going out in recent days. Among the survey completers (n=6910), 65.7% were women, 63.5% held a bachelor degree or above, and 56.2% engaged in mental labor. The overall correct rate of the knowledge questionnaire was 90%. The majority of the respondents (97.1%) had confidence that China can win the battle against COVID-19. Nearly all of the participants (98.0%) wore masks when going out in recent days. In multiple logistic regression analyses, the COVID-19 knowledge score (OR: 0.75-0.90, P<0.001) was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of negative attitudes and preventive practices towards COVID-2019. Most Chinese residents of a relatively high socioeconomic status, in particular women, are knowledgeable about COVID-19, hold optimistic attitudes, and have appropriate practices towards COVID-19. Health education programs aimed at improving COVID-19 knowledge are helpful for Chinese residents to hold optimistic attitudes and maintain appropriate practices. Due to the limited sample representativeness, we must be cautious when generalizing these findings to populations of a low socioeconomic status.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/ijbs.45221

RECORD 5
TITLE
  Mass masking in the COVID-19 epidemic: people need guidance
AUTHOR NAMES
  Leung C.C.;  Lam T.H.;  Cheng K.K.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10228 (945). Date of Publication: 21 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30520-1

RECORD 6
TITLE
  Screening for Chinese medical staff mental health by SDS and SAS during the outbreak of COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liang Y.;  Chen M.;  Zheng X.;  Liu J.
SOURCE
  Journal of Psychosomatic Research (2020) 133 Article Number: 110102. Date of Publication: 1 Jun 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2020.110102

RECORD 7
TITLE
  The COVID-19 outbreak: Crucial role the psychiatrists can play
AUTHOR NAMES
  Banerjee D.
SOURCE
  Asian Journal of Psychiatry (2020) 50 Article Number: 102014. Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2020.102014

RECORD 8
TITLE
  Covid-19 mass testing facilities could end the epidemic rapidly
AUTHOR NAMES
  Peto J.
SOURCE
  The BMJ (2020) 368. Date of Publication: 22 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1163

RECORD 9
TITLE
  One size does not fit all – Patterns of vulnerability and resilience in the COVID-19 pandemic and why heterogeneity of disease matters
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sominsky L.;  Walker D.W.;  Spencer S.J.
SOURCE
  Brain, Behavior, and Immunity (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.03.016

RECORD 10
TITLE
  COVID-19: a potential public health problem for homeless populations
AUTHOR NAMES
  Tsai J.;  Wilson M.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Public Health (2020) 5:4 (e186-e187). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30053-0

RECORD 11
TITLE
  Prevalence and predictors of PTSS during COVID-19 outbreak in China hardest-hit areas: Gender differences matter
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu N.;  Zhang F.;  Wei C.;  Jia Y.;  Shang Z.;  Sun L.;  Wu L.;  Sun Z.;  Zhou Y.;  Wang Y.;  Liu W.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry Research (2020) 287 Article Number: 112921. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  The outbreak of COVID-19 in China in December 2019 has been identified as a pandemic and a health emergency of global concern. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence and predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in China hardest-hit areas during COVID-19 outbreak, especially exploring the gender difference existing in PTSS. One month after the December 2019 COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan China, we surveyed PTSS and sleep qualities among 285 residents in Wuhan and surrounding cities using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and 4 items from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Hierarchical regression analysis and non-parametric test were used to analyze the data. Results indicated that the prevalence of PTSS in China hardest-hit areas a month after the COVID-19 outbreak was 7%. Women reported significant higher PTSS in the domains of re-experiencing, negative alterations in cognition or mood, and hyper-arousal. Participants with better sleep quality or less frequency of early awakenings reported lower PTSS. Professional and effective mental health services should be designed in order to aid the psychological wellbeing of the population in affected areas, especially those living in hardest-hit areas, females and people with poor sleep quality.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112921

RECORD 12
TITLE
  Parenting in a time of COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cluver L.;  Lachman J.M.;  Sherr L.;  Wessels I.;  Krug E.;  Rakotomalala S.;  Blight S.;  Hillis S.;  Bachman G.;  Green O.;  Butchart A.;  Tomlinson M.;  Ward C.L.;  Doubt J.;  McDonald K.
SOURCE
  Lancet (London, England) (2020). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30736-4

RECORD 13
TITLE
  Surviving Sepsis Campaign: guidelines on the management of critically ill adults with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Alhazzani W.;  Møller M.H.;  Arabi Y.M.;  Loeb M.;  Gong M.N.;  Fan E.;  Oczkowski S.;  Levy M.M.;  Derde L.;  Dzierba A.;  Du B.;  Aboodi M.;  Wunsch H.;  Cecconi M.;  Koh Y.;  Chertow D.S.;  Maitland K.;  Alshamsi F.;  Belley-Cote E.;  Greco M.;  Laundy M.;  Morgan J.S.;  Kesecioglu J.;  McGeer A.;  Mermel L.;  Mammen M.J.;  Alexander P.E.;  Arrington A.;  Centofanti J.E.;  Citerio G.;  Baw B.;  Memish Z.A.;  Hammond N.;  Hayden F.G.;  Evans L.;  Rhodes A.
SOURCE
  Intensive care medicine (2020). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of a rapidly spreading illness, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), affecting thousands of people around the world. Urgent guidance for clinicians caring for the sickest of these patients is needed. METHODS: We formed a panel of 36 experts from 12 countries. All panel members completed the World Health Organization conflict of interest disclosure form. The panel proposed 53 questions that are relevant to the management of COVID-19 in the ICU. We searched the literature for direct and indirect evidence on the management of COVID-19 in critically ill patients in the ICU. We identified relevant and recent systematic reviews on most questions relating to supportive care. We assessed the certainty in the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, then generated recommendations based on the balance between benefit and harm, resource and cost implications, equity, and feasibility. Recommendations were either strong or weak, or in the form of best practice recommendations. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel issued 54 statements, of which 4 are best practice statements, 9 are strong recommendations, and 35 are weak recommendations. No recommendation was provided for 6 questions. The topics were: (1) infection control, (2) laboratory diagnosis and specimens, (3) hemodynamic support, (4) ventilatory support, and (5) COVID-19 therapy. CONCLUSION: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel issued several recommendations to help support healthcare workers caring for critically ill ICU patients with COVID-19. When available, we will provide new recommendations in further releases of these guidelines.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-020-06022-5

RECORD 14
TITLE
  Spotlight on Jails: COVID-19 Mitigation Policies Needed Now
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wurcel A.G.;  Dauria E.;  Zaller N.;  Nijhawan A.;  Beckwith C.;  Nowotny K.;  Brinkley-Rubinstein L.
SOURCE
  Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2020). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa346

RECORD 15
TITLE
  Dealing with psychological distress by healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 pandemia
AUTHOR NAMES
  Petzold M.B.;  Plag J.;  Ströhle A.
SOURCE
  Der Nervenarzt (2020). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00115-020-00905-0

RECORD 16
TITLE
  The Italian coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak: recommendations from clinical practice
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sorbello M.;  El-Boghdadly K.;  Di Giacinto I.;  Cataldo R.;  Esposito C.;  Falcetta S.;  Merli G.;  Cortese G.;  Corso R.M.;  Bressan F.;  Pintaudi S.;  Greif R.;  Donati A.;  Petrini F.
SOURCE
  Anaesthesia (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Novel coronavirus 2019 is a single-stranded, ribonucleic acid virus that has led to an international pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019. Clinical data from the Chinese outbreak have been reported, but experiences and recommendations from clinical practice during the Italian outbreak have not. We report the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak on regional and national healthcare infrastructure. We also report on recommendations based on clinical experiences of managing patients throughout Italy. In particular, we describe key elements of clinical management, including: safe oxygen therapy; airway management; personal protective equipment; and non-technical aspects of caring for patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019. Only through planning, training and team working will clinicians and healthcare systems be best placed to deal with the many complex implications of this new pandemic.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/anae.15049

RECORD 17
TITLE
  COVID-19 – what should anaethesiologists and intensivists know about it?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wujtewicz M.;  Dylczyk-Sommer A.;  Aszkiełowicz A.;  Zdanowski S.;  Piwowarczyk S.;  Owczuk R.
SOURCE
  Anaesthesiology intensive therapy (2020) 52:1 (34-41). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Over the past three months, the world has faced an unprecedented health hazard. The World Health Organization has announced a pandemic infection with an unknown species of coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. Spreading mainly through the droplet route, the virus causes mild symptoms in the majority of cases, the most common being: fever (80%), dry cough (56%), fatigue (22%) and muscle pain (7%); less common symptoms include a sore throat, a runny nose, diarrhea, hemoptysis and chills. A life-threatening complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection is an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which occurs more often in older adults, those with immune disorders and co-morbidities. Severe forms of the infection, being an indication for treatment in the intensive care unit, comprise acute lung inflammation, ARDS, sepsis and septic shock. The article presents basic information about etiology, pathogenesis and diagnostics (with particular emphasis on the importance of tomocomputer imaging), clinical picture, treatment and prevention of the infection. It goes on to emphasize the specific risks of providing anesthesiology and intensive care services. Due to the fact that effective causal treatment is not yet available and the number of infections and deaths increases day by day, infection prevention and strict adherence to recommendations of infection control organizations remain the basis for fighting the virus.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/ait.2020.93756

RECORD 18
TITLE
  Covid-19 and community mitigation strategies in a pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ebrahim S.H.;  Ahmed Q.A.;  Gozzer E.;  Schlagenhauf P.;  Memish Z.A.
SOURCE
  The BMJ (2020) 368 Article Number: m1066. Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1066

RECORD 19
TITLE
  Anesthesia management in cesarean section for a patient with coronavirus disease 2019
AUTHOR NAMES
  Kang X.;  Zhang R.;  He H.;  Yao Y.;  Zheng Y.;  Wen X.;  Zhu S.
SOURCE
  Zhejiang da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Zhejiang University. Medical sciences (2020) 49:1 (0). Date of Publication: 25 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects the cardio-pulmonary function of pregnant women, the anesthetic management in the cesarean section for the patients, as well as the protection for medical staff is significantly different from that in ordinary surgical operation. This paper reports a pregnant woman with COVID-19, for whom a cesarean section was successfully performed in our hospital on February 8, 2020. Anesthetic management, protection of medical staff and psychological intervention for the patients during the operation are discussed. Importance should be attached to the preoperative evaluation of pregnant women with COVID-19 and the implementation of anesthesia plan. For ordinary COVID-19 patients intraspinal anesthesia is preferred in cesarean section, and the influence on respiration and circulation in both maternal and infant should be reduced; while for severe or critically ill patients general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation should be adopted. The safety of medical environment should be ensured, and level-Ⅲ standard protection should be taken for anesthetists. Special attention and support should be given to maternal psychology. It is important to give full explanation before operation to reduce anxiety; to relieve the discomfort during operation to reduce tension; to avoid the bad mood of patients due to pain after operation.

RECORD 20
TITLE
  Expanded Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells (UC-MSCs) as a Therapeutic Strategy in Managing Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients: The Case for Compassionate Use
AUTHOR NAMES
  Atluri S.;  Manchikanti L.;  Hirsch J.A.
SOURCE
  Pain physician (2020) 23:2 (E71-E83). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  COVID-19 has affected the United States leading to a national emergency with health care and economic impact, propelling the country into a recession with disrupted lifestyles not seen in recent history. COVID-19 is a serious illness leading to multiple deaths in various countries including the United States. Several million Americans satisfy the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for being high risk. Unfortunately, the available supply of medical beds and equipment for mechanical ventilation are much less than is projected to be needed. The World Health Organization (WHO) and multiple agencies led by the CDC in the United States have attempted to organize intensive outbreak investigation programs utilizing appropriate preventive measures, evaluation, and treatment. The clinical spectrum of COVID-19 varies from asymptomatic forms to conditions encompassing multiorgan and systemic manifestations in terms of septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) syndromes. The presently approved treatments are supportive but not curative for the disease. There are multiple treatments being studied. These include vaccines, medications Remdesivir and hydroxychloroquine and potentially combination therapy. Finally, expanded umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells or (UC-MSCs) may have a role and are being studied. The cure of COVID-19 is essentially dependent on the patients’ own immune system. When the immune system is over activated in an attempt to kill the virus, this can lead to the production of a large number of inflammatory factors, resulting in severe cytokine storm. The cytokine storm may induce organ damage followed by the edema, dysfunction of air exchange, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute cardiac injury, and secondary infection, which may lead to death. Thus, at this point, the avoidance of the cytokine storm may be the key for the treatment of HCOV-19 infected patients.In China, where there was limited availability of effective modalities to manage COVID-19 several patients were treated with expanded UC-MSCs. Additionally, the Italian College of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care have reported guidelines to treat coronavirus patients with stem cells in the hope of decreasing the number of patients going to the ICU, and, also relatively quickly getting them out of ICU. In this manuscript, we describe the urgent need for various solutions, pathogenesis of coronavirus and the clinical evidence for treatment of COVID-19 with stem cells. The limited but emerging evidence regarding UC MSC in managing COVID-19 suggests that it might be considered for compassionate use in critically ill patients to reduce morbidity and mortality in the United States. The administration and Coronavirus Task Force might wish to approach the potential of expanded UC-MSCs as an evolutionary therapeutic strategy in managing COVID-19 illness with a 3-pronged approach: If proven safe and effective on a specific and limited basis…1. Minimize regulatory burden by all agencies so that critically ill COVID-19 patients will have access regardless of their financial circumstance.2. Institute appropriate safeguards to avoid negative consequences from unscrupulous actors.3. With proper informed consent from patients or proxy when necessary, and subject to accumulation of data in that cohort, allow the procedure to be initiated in critically ill patients who are not responding to conventional therapies.KEY WORDS: Coronavirus, COVID-19, cytokine storm, multiorgan failure, expanded umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells.

RECORD 21
TITLE
  Managing mental health challenges faced by healthcare workers during covid-19 pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Greenberg N.;  Docherty M.;  Gnanapragasam S.;  Wessely S.
SOURCE
  BMJ (Clinical research ed.) (2020) 368 (m1211). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1211

RECORD 22
TITLE
  Seven tips to manage your mental health and well-being during the COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Dickerson D.
SOURCE
  Nature (2020). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-00933-5

RECORD 23
TITLE
  Posttraumatic stress symptoms and attitude toward crisis mental health services among clinically stable patients with COVID-19 in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Bo H.-X.;  Li W.;  Yang Y.;  Wang Y.;  Zhang Q.;  Cheung T.;  Wu X.;  Xiang Y.-T.
SOURCE
  Psychological medicine (2020) (1-7). Date of Publication: 27 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291720000999

RECORD 24
TITLE
  Remote Treatment Delivery in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wright J.H.;  Caudill R.
SOURCE
  Psychotherapy and psychosomatics (2020) (1-3). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000507376

RECORD 25
TITLE
  Early epidemiological analysis of the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak based on crowdsourced data: a population-level observational study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sun K.;  Chen J.;  Viboud C.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Digital Health (2020) 2:4 (e201-e208). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: As the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) progresses, epidemiological data are needed to guide situational awareness and intervention strategies. Here we describe efforts to compile and disseminate epidemiological information on COVID-19 from news media and social networks. Methods: In this population-level observational study, we searched DXY.cn, a health-care-oriented social network that is currently streaming news reports on COVID-19 from local and national Chinese health agencies. We compiled a list of individual patients with COVID-19 and daily province-level case counts between Jan 13 and Jan 31, 2020, in China. We also compiled a list of internationally exported cases of COVID-19 from global news media sources (Kyodo News, The Straits Times, and CNN), national governments, and health authorities. We assessed trends in the epidemiology of COVID-19 and studied the outbreak progression across China, assessing delays between symptom onset, seeking care at a hospital or clinic, and reporting, before and after Jan 18, 2020, as awareness of the outbreak increased. All data were made publicly available in real time. Findings: We collected data for 507 patients with COVID-19 reported between Jan 13 and Jan 31, 2020, including 364 from mainland China and 143 from outside of China. 281 (55%) patients were male and the median age was 46 years (IQR 35–60). Few patients (13 [3%]) were younger than 15 years and the age profile of Chinese patients adjusted for baseline demographics confirmed a deficit of infections among children. Across the analysed period, delays between symptom onset and seeking care at a hospital or clinic were longer in Hubei province than in other provinces in mainland China and internationally. In mainland China, these delays decreased from 5 days before Jan 18, 2020, to 2 days thereafter until Jan 31, 2020 (p=0·0009). Although our sample captures only 507 (5·2%) of 9826 patients with COVID-19 reported by official sources during the analysed period, our data align with an official report published by Chinese authorities on Jan 28, 2020. Interpretation: News reports and social media can help reconstruct the progression of an outbreak and provide detailed patient-level data in the context of a health emergency. The availability of a central physician-oriented social network facilitated the compilation of publicly available COVID-19 data in China. As the outbreak progresses, social media and news reports will probably capture a diminishing fraction of COVID-19 cases globally due to reporting fatigue and overwhelmed health-care systems. In the early stages of an outbreak, availability of public datasets is important to encourage analytical efforts by independent teams and provide robust evidence to guide interventions. Funding: Fogarty International Center, US National Institutes of Health.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2589-7500(20)30026-1

RECORD 26
TITLE
  Mental health care for international Chinese students affected by the COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhai Y.;  Du X.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e22). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30089-4

RECORD 27
TITLE
  Patients with mental health disorders in the COVID-19 epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yao H.;  Chen J.-H.;  Xu Y.-F.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e21). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30090-0

RECORD 28
TITLE
  The neglected health of international migrant workers in the COVID-19 epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liem A.;  Wang C.;  Wariyanti Y.;  Latkin C.A.;  Hall B.J.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e20). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30076-6

RECORD 29
TITLE
  Mental health services for older adults in China during the COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yang Y.;  Li W.;  Zhang Q.;  Zhang L.;  Cheung T.;  Xiang Y.-T.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e19). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30079-1

RECORD 30
TITLE
  The Role of Telehealth in Reducing the Mental Health Burden from COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhou X.;  Snoswell C.L.;  Harding L.E.;  Bambling M.;  Edirippulige S.;  Bai X.;  Smith A.C.
SOURCE
  Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association (2020). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2020.0068

RECORD 31
TITLE
  Public Mental Health Crisis during COVID-19 Pandemic, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Dong L.;  Bouey J.
SOURCE
  Emerging infectious diseases (2020) 26:7. Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The 2019 novel coronavirus disease emerged in China in late 2019-early 2020 and spread rapidly. China has been implementing emergency psychological crisis interventions to reduce the negative psychosocial impact on public mental health, but challenges exist. Public mental health interventions should be formally integrated into public health preparedness and emergency response plans.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2607.200407

RECORD 32
TITLE
  Clinical Characteristics of Children with Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Hubei, China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zheng F.;  Liao C.;  Fan Q.-H.;  Chen H.-B.;  Zhao X.-G.;  Xie Z.-G.;  Li X.-L.;  Chen C.-X.;  Lu X.-X.;  Liu Z.-S.;  Lu W.;  Chen C.-B.;  Jiao R.;  Zhang A.-M.;  Wang J.-T.;  Ding X.-W.;  Zeng Y.-G.;  Cheng L.-P.;  Huang Q.-F.;  Wu J.;  Luo X.-C.;  Wang Z.-J.;  Zhong Y.-Y.;  Bai Y.;  Wu X.-Y.;  Jin R.-M.
SOURCE
  Current medical science (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, COVID-19 has occurred unexpectedly and emerged as a health problem worldwide. Despite the rapidly increasing number of cases in subsequent weeks, the clinical characteristics of pediatric cases are rarely described. A cross-sectional multicenter study was carried out in 10 hospitals across Hubei province. A total of 25 confirmed pediatric cases of COVID-19 were collected. The demographic data, epidemiological history, underlying diseases, clinical manifestations, laboratory and radiological data, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. Of 25 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, the boy to girl ratio was 1.27:1. The median age was 3 years. COVID-19 cases in children aged ❤ years, 3.6 years, and ≥6-years patients were 10 (40%), 6 (24%), and 9 (36%), respectively. The most common symptoms at onset of illness were fever (13 [52%]), and dry cough (11 [44%]). Chest CT images showed essential normal in 8 cases (33.3%), unilateral involvement of lungs in 5 cases (20.8%), and bilateral involvement in 11 cases (45.8%). Clinical diagnoses included upper respiratory tract infection (n=8), mild pneumonia (n=15), and critical cases (n=2). Two critical cases (8%) were given invasive mechanical ventilation, corticosteroids, and immunoglobulin. The symptoms in 24 (96%) of 25 patients were alleviated and one patient had been discharged. It was concluded that children were susceptible to COVID-19 like adults, while the clinical presentations and outcomes were more favorable in children. However, children less than 3 years old accounted for majority cases and critical cases lied in this age group, which demanded extra attentions during home caring and hospitalization treatment.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11596-020-2172-6

RECORD 33
TITLE
  Considérations pratiques pour laréalisation de l’anesthésie régionale: les leçons tirées de la pandémie de COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lie S.A.;  Wong S.W.;  Wong L.T.;  Wong T.G.L.;  Chong S.Y.
SOURCE
  Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d’anesthesie (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12630-020-01637-0

RECORD 34
TITLE
  The emotional impact of Coronavirus 2019-nCoV (new Coronavirus disease)
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lima C.K.T.;  Carvalho P.M.D.M.;  Lima I.D.A.A.S.;  Nunes J.V.A.D.O.;  Saraiva J.S.;  de Souza R.I.;  da Silva C.G.L.;  Neto M.L.R.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry Research (2020) 287 Article Number: 112915. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: : A novel form of Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in Wuhan has created a confused and rapidly evolving situation. In this situational framework, patients and front-line healthcare workers are vulnerable. Method: : Studies were identified using large-circulation international journals found in two electronic databases: Scopus and Embase. Results: : Populations of patients that may require tailored interventions are older adults and international migrant workers. Older adults with psychiatric conditions may be experiencing further distress. The COVID-19 epidemic has underscored potential gaps in mental health services during emergencies. Conclusions: : Most health professionals working in isolation units and hospitals do not receive any training for providing mental health care. Fear seems more certainly a consequence of mass quarantine.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112915

RECORD 35
TITLE
  SARS-CoV-2 Cell Entry Depends on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and Is Blocked by a Clinically Proven Protease Inhibitor
AUTHOR NAMES
  Hoffmann M.;  Kleine-Weber H.;  Schroeder S.;  Krüger N.;  Herrler T.;  Erichsen S.;  Schiergens T.S.;  Herrler G.;  Wu N.-H.;  Nitsche A.;  Müller M.A.;  Drosten C.;  Pöhlmann S.
SOURCE
  Cell (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  The recent emergence of the novel, pathogenic SARS-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in China and its rapid national and international spread pose a global health emergency. Cell entry of coronaviruses depends on binding of the viral spike (S) proteins to cellular receptors and on S protein priming by host cell proteases. Unravelling which cellular factors are used by SARS-CoV-2 for entry might provide insights into viral transmission and reveal therapeutic targets. Here, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 uses the SARS-CoV receptor ACE2 for entry and the serine protease TMPRSS2 for S protein priming. A TMPRSS2 inhibitor approved for clinical use blocked entry and might constitute a treatment option. Finally, we show that the sera from convalescent SARS patients cross-neutralized SARS-2-S-driven entry. Our results reveal important commonalities between SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection and identify a potential target for antiviral intervention. The emerging SARS-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) threatens public health. Hoffmann and coworkers show that SARS-CoV-2 infection depends on the host cell factors ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and can be blocked by a clinically proven protease inhibitor. These findings might help to establish options for prevention and treatment.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.02.052

RECORD 36
TITLE
  Chemotherapy strategy for colorectal cancer under the outbreak of corona virus disease 2019
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li Y.H.;  Shen L.;  Li J.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua wei chang wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of gastrointestinal surgery (2020) 23:3 (217-219). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The outbreak of corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) makes the medical treatment of colorectal cancers difficult. Cancer patients are more susceptible to infection and tumor history is defined as an important factor of poor prognosis, which challenges both doctors and patients. For metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, maintenance therapy is the optimal choice. The patients with tumor progression or poor biological behavior should receive or continue combination chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy should reduce the intensity of treatment and shorten the therapy time. Fever patients during chemotherapy need to receive differential diagnosis and screening according to national standards. Patients with stable diseases and good general conditions may delay imaging examination. Clinicians should make individual clinical decisions based on the specifics of each patient during epidemic situation.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.cn.441530-20200225-00089

RECORD 37
TITLE
  Mental Health Strategies to Combat the Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Beyond Paranoia and Panic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Ho C.S.;  Chee C.Y.;  Ho R.C.
SOURCE
  Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore (2020) 49:1 (1-3). Date of Publication: 1 Jan 2020

RECORD 38
TITLE
  Factors associated with mental health outcomes among health care workers exposed to coronavirus disease 2019
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lai J.;  Ma S.;  Wang Y.;  Cai Z.;  Hu J.;  Wei N.;  Wu J.;  Du H.;  Chen T.;  Li R.;  Tan H.;  Kang L.;  Yao L.;  Huang M.;  Wang H.;  Wang G.;  Liu Z.;  Hu S.
SOURCE
  JAMA Network Open (2020) Article Number: e203976. Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Importance: Health care workers exposed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could be psychologically stressed. Objective: To assess the magnitude of mental health outcomes and associated factors among health care workers treating patients exposed to COVID-19 in China. Design, Settings, and Participants: This cross-sectional, survey-based, region-stratified study collected demographic data and mental health measurements from 1257 health care workers in 34 hospitals from January 29, 2020, to February 3, 2020, in China. Health care workers in hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 were eligible. Main Outcomes and Measures: The degree of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and distress was assessed by the Chinese versions of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, the 7-item Insomnia Severity Index, and the 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with mental health outcomes. Results: A total of 1257 of 1830 contacted individuals completed the survey, with a participation rate of 68.7%. A total of 813 (64.7%) were aged 26 to 40 years, and 964 (76.7%) were women. Of all participants, 764 (60.8%) were nurses, and 493 (39.2%) were physicians; 760 (60.5%) worked in hospitals in Wuhan, and 522 (41.5%) were frontline health care workers. A considerable proportion of participants reported symptoms of depression (634 [50.4%]), anxiety (560 [44.6%]), insomnia (427 [34.0%]), and distress (899 [71.5%]). Nurses, women, frontline health care workers, and those working in Wuhan, China, reported more severe degrees of all measurements of mental health symptoms than other health care workers (eg, median [IQR] Patient Health Questionnaire scores among physicians vs nurses: 4.0 [1.0-7.0] vs 5.0 [2.0-8.0]; P =.007; median [interquartile range {IQR}] Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale scores among men vs women: 2.0 [0-6.0] vs 4.0 [1.0-7.0]; P <.001; median [IQR] Insomnia Severity Index scores among frontline vs second-line workers: 6.0 [2.0-11.0] vs 4.0 [1.0-8.0]; P <.001; median [IQR] Impact of Event Scale-Revised scores among those in Wuhan vs those in Hubei outside Wuhan and those outside Hubei: 21.0 [8.5-34.5] vs 18.0 [6.0-28.0] in Hubei outside Wuhan and 15.0 [4.0-26.0] outside Hubei; P <.001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed participants from outside Hubei province were associated with lower risk of experiencing symptoms of distress compared with those in Wuhan (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.88; P =.008). Frontline health care workers engaged in direct diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with COVID-19 were associated with a higher risk of symptoms of depression (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.11-2.09; P =.01), anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.22-2.02; P <.001), insomnia (OR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.92-4.60; P <.001), and distress (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.25-2.04; P <.001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey of heath care workers in hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan and other regions in China, participants reported experiencing psychological burden, especially nurses, women, those in Wuhan, and frontline health care workers directly engaged in the diagnosis, treatment, and care for patients with COVID-19.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.3976

RECORD 39
TITLE
  Traumatization in medical staff helping with COVID-19 control
AUTHOR NAMES
  Joob B.;  Wiwanitkit V.
SOURCE
  Brain, behavior, and immunity (2020). Date of Publication: 20 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.03.020

RECORD 40
TITLE
  Action at a Distance: Geriatric Research during a Pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Nicol G.E.;  Piccirillo J.F.;  Mulsant B.H.;  Lenze E.J.
SOURCE
  Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: “Action at a distance” may be the new norm for clinical researchers in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which may require social distancing for the next 18 months. We must minimize face-to-face contact with vulnerable populations. But we must also persist, adapt, and help our older patients and study participants during the pandemic. METHODS: Clinical researchers have an obligation to help, and we can. Recommendations for clinical researchers working with older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed. RESULTS: Implement technology now: Minimize face-to-face contact with participants by utilizing digital tools, such as shifting to electronic informed consent and digital HIPAA-compliant tools like emailed surveys or telehealth assessments. Assess the psychological and social impact of COVID-19: How are participants coping? What health or social behaviors have changed? How are they keeping up with current events? What are they doing to stay connected to their families, friends, and communities? Are their health care needs being met? Current studies should be adapted immediately to these ends. Mobilize research platforms for patient needs: Leverage our relationships with participants and rapidly deploy novel clinical engagement techniques such as digital tools to intervene remotely to reduce the negative effects of social isolation on our participants. Equip research staff with tangible resources, and provide timely population-specific health information to support patients and healthcare providers. CONCLUSIONS: We have an opportunity to make an impact on our older adult patients now, as this pandemic continues to unfold. Above all, clinical researchers need to continue working – to help as many people as possible through the crisis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16443

RECORD 41
TITLE
  COVID-19 & Beyond: Micro-practices for Burnout Prevention and Emotional Wellness
AUTHOR NAMES
  Fessell D.;  Cherniss C.
SOURCE
  Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR (2020). Date of Publication: 23 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2020.03.013

RECORD 42
TITLE
  The impact of covid-19 epidemic declaration on psychological consequences: A study on active weibo users
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li S.;  Wang Y.;  Xue J.;  Zhao N.;  Zhu T.
SOURCE
  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020) 17:6 Article Number: 2032. Date of Publication: 2 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  COVID-19 (Corona Virus Disease 2019) has significantly resulted in a large number of psychological consequences. The aim of this study is to explore the impacts of COVID-19 on people’s mental health, to assist policy makers to develop actionable policies, and help clinical practitioners (e.g., social workers, psychiatrists, and psychologists) provide timely services to affected populations. We sample and analyze the Weibo posts from 17,865 active Weibo users using the approach of Online Ecological Recognition (OER) based on several machine-learning predictive models. We calculated word frequency, scores of emotional indicators (e.g., anxiety, depression, indignation, and Oxford happiness) and cognitive indicators (e.g., social risk judgment and life satisfaction) from the collected data. The sentiment analysis and the paired sample t-test were performed to examine the differences in the same group before and after the declaration of COVID-19 on 20 January, 2020. The results showed that negative emotions (e.g., anxiety, depression and indignation) and sensitivity to social risks increased, while the scores of positive emotions (e.g., Oxford happiness) and life satisfaction decreased. People were concerned more about their health and family, while less about leisure and friends. The results contribute to the knowledge gaps of short-term individual changes in psychological conditions after the outbreak. It may provide references for policy makers to plan and fight against COVID-19 effectively by improving stability of popular feelings and urgently prepare clinical practitioners to deliver corresponding therapy foundations for the risk groups and affected people.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062032

RECORD 43
TITLE
  Mental health care for medical staff in China during the COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen Q.;  Liang M.;  Li Y.;  Guo J.;  Fei D.;  Wang L.;  He L.;  Sheng C.;  Cai Y.;  Li X.;  Wang J.;  Zhang Z.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e15-e16). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30078-X

RECORD 44
TITLE
  Psychological interventions for people affected by the COVID-19 epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Duan L.;  Zhu G.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (300-302). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30073-0

RECORD 45
TITLE
  Online mental health services in China during the COVID-19 outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Liu S.;  Yang L.;  Zhang C.;  Xiang Y.-T.;  Liu Z.;  Hu S.;  Zhang B.
SOURCE
  The Lancet Psychiatry (2020) 7:4 (e17-e18). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30077-8

RECORD 46
TITLE
  Intubation and Ventilation amid the COVID-19 Outbreak: Wuhan’s Experience
AUTHOR NAMES
  Meng L.;  Qiu H.;  Wan L.;  Ai Y.;  Xue Z.;  Guo Q.;  Deshpande R.;  Zhang L.;  Meng J.;  Tong C.;  Liu H.;  Xiong L.
SOURCE
  Anesthesiology (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The COVID-19 outbreak has led to 80,409 diagnosed cases and 3,012 deaths in mainland China based on the data released on March 4, 2020. Approximately 3.2% of patients with COVID-19 required intubation and invasive ventilation at some point in the disease course. Providing best practices regarding intubation and ventilation for an overwhelming number of patients with COVID-19 amid an enhanced risk of cross-infection is a daunting undertaking. The authors presented the experience of caring for the critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan. It is extremely important to follow strict self-protection precautions. Timely, but not premature, intubation is crucial to counter a progressively enlarging oxygen debt despite high-flow oxygen therapy and bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation. Thorough preparation, satisfactory preoxygenation, modified rapid sequence induction, and rapid intubation using a video laryngoscope are widely used intubation strategies in Wuhan. Lung-protective ventilation, prone position ventilation, and adequate sedation and analgesia are essential components of ventilation management.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003296

RECORD 47
TITLE
  Response of Chinese Anesthesiologists to the COVID-19 Outbreak
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zhang H.-F.;  Bo L.-L.;  Lin Y.;  Li F.-X.;  Sun S.-J.;  Lin H.-B.;  Xu S.-Y.;  Bian J.-J.;  Yao S.-L.;  Chen X.-D.;  Meng L.;  Deng X.-M.
SOURCE
  Anesthesiology (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  The coronavirus disease 2019, named COVID-19 officially by the World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland) on February 12, 2020, has spread at unprecedented speed. After the first outbreak in Wuhan, China, Chinese anesthesiologists encountered increasing numbers of infected patients since December 2019. Because the main route of transmission is via respiratory droplets and close contact, anesthesia providers are at a high risk when responding to the devastating mass emergency. So far, actions have been taken including but not limited to nationwide actions and online education regarding special procedures of airway management, oxygen therapy, ventilation support, hemodynamic management, sedation, and analgesia. As the epidemic situation has lasted for months (thus far), special platforms have also been set up to provide free mental health care to all anesthesia providers participating in acute and critical caring for COVID-19 patients. The current article documents the actions taken, lesson learned, and future work needed.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003300

RECORD 48
TITLE
  Escalating infection control response to the rapidly evolving epidemiology of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 in Hong Kong
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cheng V.C.C.;  Wong S.-C.;  Chen J.H.K.;  Yip C.C.Y.;  Chuang V.W.M.;  Tsang O.T.Y.;  Sridhar S.;  Chan J.F.W.;  Ho P.-L.;  Yuen K.-Y.
SOURCE
  Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background:To describe the infection control preparedness for Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 [previously known as 2019-novel coronavirus] in the first 42 days after announcement of a cluster of pneumonia in China, on 31 December 2019 (day 1) in Hong Kong.Methods:A bundle approach of active and enhanced laboratory surveillance, early airborne infection isolation, rapid molecular diagnostic testing, and contact tracing for healthcare workers (HCWs) with unprotected exposure in the hospitals was implemented. Epidemiological characteristics of confirmed cases, environmental and air samples were collected and analyzed.Results:From day 1 to day 42, forty-two (3.3%) of 1275 patients fulfilling active (n=29) and enhanced laboratory surveillance (n=13) confirmed to have SARS-CoV-2 infection. The number of locally acquired case significantly increased from 1 (7.7%) of 13 [day 22 to day 32] to 27 (93.1%) of 29 confirmed case [day 33 to day 42] (p<0.001). Twenty-eight patients (66.6%) came from 8 family clusters. Eleven (2.7%) of 413 HCWs caring these confirmed cases were found to have unprotected exposure requiring quarantine for 14 days. None of them was infected and nosocomial transmission of SARS-CoV-2 was not observed. Environmental surveillance performed in a patient with viral load of 3.3×106 copies/ml (pooled nasopharyngeal/ throat swab) and 5.9×106 copies/ml (saliva) respectively. SARS-CoV-2 revealed in 1 (7.7%) of 13 environmental samples, but not in 8 air samples collected at a distance of 10 cm from patient’s chin with or without wearing a surgical mask.Conclusion:Appropriate hospital infection control measures could prevent nosocomial transmission of SARS-CoV-2.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.58

RECORD 49
TITLE
  COVID-2019 and Pregnancy: A plea for transparent reporting of all cases
AUTHOR NAMES
  Sahu K.K.;  Lal A.;  Mishra A.K.
SOURCE
  Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica (2020). Date of Publication: 19 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  We read with great interest a recent editorial by Liang et al. on the management of COVID-19 in pregnancy. Their recommendations are clinically oriented and are likely to be useful to obstetricians and other healthcare professionals caring for such patients. However, we feel that development of evidence-based guidelines has been hindered by selective reporting of cases. We hereby would like to discuss a few additional points with regards to the challenges encountered while managing pregnant patients with COVID-19.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aogs.13850

RECORD 50
TITLE
  How health anxiety influences responses to viral outbreaks like COVID-19: What all decision-makers, health authorities, and health care professionals need to know
AUTHOR NAMES
  Asmundson G.J.G.;  Taylor S.
SOURCE
  Journal of Anxiety Disorders (2020) 71 Article Number: 102211. Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2020.102211

RECORD 51
TITLE
  Management of corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19): the Zhejiang experience
AUTHOR NAMES
  Xu K.;  Cai H.;  Shen Y.;  Ni Q.;  Chen Y.;  Hu S.;  Li J.;  Wang H.;  Yu L.;  Huang H.;  Qiu Y.;  Wei G.;  Fang Q.;  Zhou J.;  Sheng J.;  Liang T.;  Li L.
SOURCE
  Zhejiang da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Zhejiang University. Medical sciences (2020) 49:1 (0). Date of Publication: 21 Feb 2020
ABSTRACT
  The current epidemic situation of corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19) still remained severe. As the National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine is the primary medical care center for COVID-19 inZhejiang Province. Based on the present expert consensus carried out by National Health Commission and National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, our team summarized and established an effective treatment strategy centered on “Four-Anti and Two-Balance” for clinical practice. The “Four-Anti and Two-Balance”strategy included antivirus, anti-shock, anti-hyoxemia, anti-secondary infection, and maintaining of water, electrolyte and acid base balance and microecological balance. Meanwhile, integrated multidisciplinarypersonalized treatment was recommended to improve therapeutic effect. The importance of early viralogical detection, dynamic monitoring of inflammatory indexes and chest radiograph was emphasized in clinical decision-making. Sputum was observed with the highest positive rate of RT-PCR results. Viral nucleic acids could be detected in10% patients’blood samples at acute periodand 50% of patients had positive RT-PCR results in their feces. We also isolated alive viral strains from feces, indicating potential infectiousness of feces.Dynamic cytokine detection was necessary to timely identifyingcytokine storms and application of artificial liver blood purification system. The “Four-Anti and Two-Balance”strategyeffectively increased cure rate and reduced mortality. Early antiviral treatment could alleviate disease severity and prevent illness progression, and we found lopinavir/ritonavir combined with abidol showed antiviraleffects in COVID-19. Shock and hypoxemia were usually caused by cytokine storms. The artificial liver blood purification system could rapidly remove inflammatory mediators and block cytokine storm.Moreover, it also favoredthe balance of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base and thus improved treatment efficacy in critical illness. For cases of severe illness, early and also short periods of moderate glucocorticoid was supported. Patients with oxygenation index below 200 mmHg should be transferred to intensive medical center. Conservative oxygen therapy was preferred and noninvasive ventilation was not recommended. Patients with mechanical ventilation should be strictly supervised with cluster ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention strategies. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be prescribed rationally and was not recommended except for patients with long course of disease, repeated fever and elevated procalcitonin (PCT), meanwhile secondary fungal infection should be concerned.Some patients with COVID-19 showed intestinal microbialdysbiosis with decreasedprobiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Nutritional and gastrointestinal function should be assessed for all patients.Nutritional support and application of prebiotics or probiotics were suggested to regulate the balance of intestinal microbiota and reduce the risk of secondary infection due to bacterial translocation. Anxiety and fear were common in patients with COVID-19. Therefore, we established dynamic assessment and warning for psychological crisis. We also integrated Chinese medicine in treatment to promote disease rehabilitation through classification methods of traditional Chinese medicine. We optimized nursing process for severe patients to promote their rehabilitation. It remained unclear about viral clearance pattern after the SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, two weeks’ quarantine for discharged patients was required and a regular following up was also needed.The Zhejiang experience above and suggestions have been implemented in our center and achieved good results. However, since COVID-19 was a newly emerging disease, more work was warranted to improve strategies of prevention, diagnosis and treatment for COVID-19.

RECORD 52
TITLE
  Epidemiologic and Clinical Characteristics of 91 Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19 in Zhejiang, China: A retrospective, multi-centre case series
AUTHOR NAMES
  Qian G.-Q.;  Yang N.-B.;  Ding F.;  Ma A.H.Y.;  Wang Z.-Y.;  Shen Y.-F.;  Shi C.-W.;  Lian X.;  Chu J.-G.;  Chen L.;  Wang Z.-Y.;  Ren D.-W.;  Li G.-X.;  Chen X.-Q.;  Shen H.-J.;  Chen X.-M.
SOURCE
  QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians (2020). Date of Publication: 17 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: Recent studies have focused initial clinical and Epidemiologic characteristics on the COVID-19, mainly revealing situation in Wuhan, Hubei. AIM: To reveal more data on the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients outside of Wuhan, in Zhejiang, China. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: 88 cases of laboratory-confirmed and 3 cases of clinical-confirmed COVID-19 were admitted to five hospitals in Zhejiang province, China. Data were collected from 20 January 2020 to 11 February 2020. RESULTS: Of all 91 patients, 88 (96.70%) were laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 with throat swab samples that tested positive for SARS-Cov-2 while 3 (3.30%) were clinical-diagnosed COVID-19 cases. The median age of the patients was 50 (36.5-57) years, and female accounted for 59.34%. In this sample 40 (43.96%) patients had contracted the diseases from local cases, 31 (34.07%) patients had been to Wuhan/Hubei, 8 (8.79%) cases had contacted with people from Wuhan, 11 (12.09%) cases were confirmed aircraft transmission. In particular within the city of Ningbo, 60.52% cases can be traced back to an event held in a temple. The most common symptoms were fever (71.43%), cough (60.44%) and fatigue (43.96%). The median of incubation period was 6 (IQR, 3-8) days and the median time from first visit to a doctor to confirmed diagnosis was 1 (1-2) days. According to the Chest computed tomography scans, 67.03% cases had bilateral pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: Social activity cluster, family cluster and travel by airplane were how COVID-19 patients get transmitted and could be rapidly diagnosed COVID-19 in Zhejiang.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcaa089

RECORD 53
TITLE
  Immediate psychological responses and associated factors during the initial stage of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic among the general population in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wang C.;  Pan R.;  Wan X.;  Tan Y.;  Xu L.;  Ho C.S.;  Ho R.C.
SOURCE
  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020) 17:5 Article Number: 1729. Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic is a public health emergency of international concern and poses a challenge to psychological resilience. Research data are needed to develop evidence-driven strategies to reduce adverse psychological impacts and psychiatric symptoms during the epidemic. The aim of this study was to survey the general public in China to better understand their levels of psychological impact, anxiety, depression, and stress during the initial stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. The data will be used for future reference. Methods: From 31 January to 2 February 2020, we conducted an online survey using snowball sampling techniques. The online survey collected information on demographic data, physical symptoms in the past 14 days, contact history with COVID-19, knowledge and concerns about COVID-19, precautionary measures against COVID-19, and additional information required with respect to COVID-19. Psychological impact was assessed by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and mental health status was assessed by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Results: This study included 1210 respondents from 194 cities in China. In total, 53.8% of respondents rated the psychological impact of the outbreak as moderate or severe; 16.5% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms; 28.8% reported moderate to severe anxiety symptoms; and 8.1% reported moderate to severe stress levels. Most respondents spent 20–24 h per day at home (84.7%); were worried about their family members contracting COVID-19 (75.2%); and were satisfied with the amount of health information available (75.1%). Female gender, student status, specific physical symptoms (e.g., myalgia, dizziness, coryza), and poor self-rated health status were significantly associated with a greater psychological impact of the outbreak and higher levels of stress, anxiety, and depression (p < 0.05). Specific up-to-date and accurate health information (e.g., treatment, local outbreak situation) and particular precautionary measures (e.g., hand hygiene, wearing a mask) were associated with a lower psychological impact of the outbreak and lower levels of stress, anxiety, and depression (p < 0.05). Conclusions: During the initial phase of the COVID-19 outbreak in China, more than half of the respondents rated the psychological impact as moderate-to-severe, and about one-third reported moderate-to-severe anxiety. Our findings identify factors associated with a lower level of psychological impact and better mental health status that can be used to formulate psychological interventions to improve the mental health of vulnerable groups during the COVID-19 epidemic.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051729

RECORD 54
TITLE
  Trust is a key factor in the willingness of health professionals to work during the COVID-19 outbreak: Experience from the H1N1 pandemic in Japan 2009
AUTHOR NAMES
  Imai H.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pcn.12995

RECORD 55
TITLE
  Iranian mental health during the COVID-19 epidemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Zandifar A.;  Badrfam R.
SOURCE
  Asian Journal of Psychiatry (2020) 51 Article Number: 101990. Date of Publication: 1 Jun 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2020.101990

RECORD 56
TITLE
  And now for something completely different: from 2019-nCoV and COVID-19 to 2020-nMan
AUTHOR NAMES
  Froes F.
SOURCE
  Pulmonology (2020) 26:2 (114-115). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pulmoe.2020.02.010

RECORD 57
TITLE
  A conceptual model for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in Wuhan, China with individual reaction and governmental action
AUTHOR NAMES
  Lin Q.;  Zhao S.;  Gao D.;  Lou Y.;  Yang S.;  Musa S.S.;  Wang M.H.;  Cai Y.;  Wang W.;  Yang L.;  He D.
SOURCE
  International Journal of Infectious Diseases (2020) 93 (211-216). Date of Publication: 1 Apr 2020
ABSTRACT
  The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, emerged in Wuhan, China in the end of 2019, has claimed more than 2600 lives as of 24 February 2020 and posed a huge threat to global public health. The Chinese government has implemented control measures including setting up special hospitals and travel restriction to mitigate the spread. We propose conceptual models for the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan with the consideration of individual behavioural reaction and governmental actions, e.g., holiday extension, travel restriction, hospitalisation and quarantine. We employe the estimates of these two key components from the 1918 influenza pandemic in London, United Kingdom, incorporated zoonotic introductions and the emigration, and then compute future trends and the reporting ratio. The model is concise in structure, and it successfully captures the course of the COVID-19 outbreak, and thus sheds light on understanding the trends of the outbreak.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2020.02.058

RECORD 58
TITLE
  Vicarious traumatization in the general public, members, and non-members of medical teams aiding in COVID-19 control
AUTHOR NAMES
  Li Z.;  Ge J.;  Yang M.;  Feng J.;  Qiao M.;  Jiang R.;  Bi J.;  Zhan G.;  Xu X.;  Wang L.;  Zhou Q.;  Zhou C.;  Pan Y.;  Liu S.;  Zhang H.;  Yang J.;  Zhu B.;  Hu Y.;  Hashimoto K.;  Jia Y.;  Wang H.;  Wang R.;  Liu C.;  Yang C.
SOURCE
  Brain, Behavior, and Immunity (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  Since December 2019, more than 79,000 people have been diagnosed with infection of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). A large number of medical staff was sent to Wuhan city and Hubei province to aid COVID-19 control. Psychological stress, especially vicarious traumatization caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, should not be ignored. To address this concern, the study employed a total of 214 general public and 526 nurses (i.e., 234 front-line nurses and 292 non-front-line nurses) to evaluate vicarious traumatization scores via a mobile app-based questionnaire. Front-line nurses are engaged in the process of providing care for patients with COVID-19. The results showed that the vicarious traumatization scores for front-line nurses including scores for physiological and psychological responses, were significantly lower than those of non-front-line nurses (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the vicarious traumatization scores of the general public were significantly higher than those of the front-line nurses (P < 0.001); however, no statistical difference was observed compared to the scores of non-front-line nurses (P > 0.05). Therefore, increased attention should be paid to the psychological problems of the medical staff, especially non-front-line nurses, and general public under the situation of the spread and control of COVID-19. Early strategies that aim to prevent and treat vicarious traumatization in medical staff and general public are extremely necessary.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.03.007

RECORD 59
TITLE
  Mental health survey of 230 medical staff in a tertiary infectious disease hospital for COVID-19
AUTHOR NAMES
  Huang J.Z.;  Han M.F.;  Luo T.D.;  Ren A.K.;  Zhou X.P.
SOURCE
  Zhonghua lao dong wei sheng zhi ye bing za zhi = Zhonghua laodong weisheng zhiyebing zazhi = Chinese journal of industrial hygiene and occupational diseases (2020) 38 (E001). Date of Publication: 4 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Objective: To investigate the mental health of clinical first-line medical staff in COVID-19 epidemic and provide theoretical basis for psychological intervention. Method: The mental health status of the first-line medical staff was investigated by Self-rating Anxiety Acale (SAS) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Self-rating Scale(PTSD-SS). From February 7 to 14, 2020, 246 medical staff were investigated who participated in the treatment of COVID-19 using cluster sampling , and received 230 responses, with a recovery rate of 93.5%. Results: The incidence of anxiety in medical staff was 23.04% (53/230), and the score of SAS was (42.91 ± 10.89). Among them, the incidence of severe anxiety, moderate anxiety and mild anxiety were 2.17% (5/230), 4.78% (11/230) and 16.09% (37/230), respectively. The incidence of anxiety in female medical staff was higher than that in male [25.67% (48/187) vs 11.63% (5/43), Z=-2.008, P=0.045], the score of SAS in female medical staff was higher than that in male [(43.78±11.12) vs (39.14 ± 9.01), t =-2.548, P=0.012]. The incidence of anxiety in nurses was higher than that in doctors [26.88% (43/160) vs 14.29% (10/70), Z=-2.066, P=0.039], and the score of SAS in nurses was higher than that in doctors [(44.84±10.42) vs (38.50±10.72), t =-4.207, P<0.001]. The incidence of stress disorder in medical staff was 27.39% (63/230), and the score of PTSD-SS was (42.92 ± 17.88). The score of PTSD-SS in female medical staff was higher than that of male [(44.30±18.42) vs(36.91 ± 13.95), t=-2.472, P=0.014]. Conclusions: In COVID-19 epidemic, the incidence of anxiety and stress disorder is high among medical staff. Medical institutions should strengthen the training of psychological skills of medical staff. Special attention should be paid to the mental health of female nurses.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.cn121094-20200219-00063

RECORD 60
TITLE
  The deadly coronaviruses: The 2003 SARS pandemic and the 2020 novel coronavirus epidemic in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Yang Y.;  Peng F.;  Wang R.;  Guan K.;  Jiang T.;  Xu G.;  Sun J.;  Chang C.
SOURCE
  Journal of Autoimmunity (2020) Article Number: 102434. Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  The 2019-nCoV is officially called SARS-CoV-2 and is the cause of the disease named COVID-19. This viral epidemic in China has led to the deaths of over 1800 people, mostly elderly or those with an underlying chronic disease or immunosuppressed state. This is the third serious Coronavirus outbreak in less than 20 years, following SARS in 2002–2003 and MERS in 2012. While human strains of Coronavirus are associated with about 15% of cases of the common cold, the SARS-CoV-2 may present with varying degrees of severity, from flu-like symptoms to death. It is currently believed that this deadly Coronavirus strain originated from wild animals at the Huanan market in Wuhan, a city in Hubei province. Bats, snakes and pangolins have been cited as potential carriers based on the sequence homology of CoV isolated from these animals and the viral nucleic acids of the virus isolated from SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. Extreme quarantine measures, including sealing off large cities, closing borders and confining people to their homes, were instituted in January 2020 to prevent spread of the virus, but by that time much of the damage had been done, as human-human transmission became evident. While these quarantine measures are necessary and have prevented a historical disaster along the lines of the Spanish flu, earlier recognition and earlier implementation of quarantine measures may have been even more effective. Lessons learned from SARS resulted in faster determination of the nucleic acid sequence and a more robust quarantine strategy. However, it is clear that finding an effective antiviral and developing a vaccine are still significant challenges. The costs of the epidemic are not limited to medical aspects, as the virus has led to significant sociological, psychological and economic effects globally. Unfortunately, emergence of SARS-CoV-2 has led to numerous reports of Asians being subjected to racist behavior and hate crimes across the world.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaut.2020.102434

RECORD 61
TITLE
  A novel approach of consultation on 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19)-related psychological and mental problems: Structured letter therapy
AUTHOR NAMES
  Xiao C.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry Investigation (2020) 17:2 (175-176). Date of Publication: 1 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.30773/pi.2020.0047

RECORD 62
TITLE
  Timely research papers about COVID-19 in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Xiang Y.-T.;  Li W.;  Zhang Q.;  Jin Y.;  Rao W.-W.;  Zeng L.-N.;  Lok G.K.I.;  Chow I.H.I.;  Cheung T.;  Hall B.J.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10225 (684-685). Date of Publication: 29 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30375-5

RECORD 63
TITLE
  COVID-19: what is next for public health?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Heymann D.L.;  Shindo N.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10224 (542-545). Date of Publication: 22 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30374-3

RECORD 64
TITLE
  Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV): The need to maintain regular physical activity while taking precautions
AUTHOR NAMES
  Chen P.;  Mao L.;  Nassis G.P.;  Harmer P.;  Ainsworth B.E.;  Li F.
SOURCE
  Journal of Sport and Health Science (2020) 9:2 (103-104). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jshs.2020.02.001

RECORD 65
TITLE
  Preparedness and vulnerability of African countries against importations of COVID-19: a modelling study
AUTHOR NAMES
  Gilbert M.;  Pullano G.;  Pinotti F.;  Valdano E.;  Poletto C.;  Boëlle P.-Y.;  D’Ortenzio E.;  Yazdanpanah Y.;  Eholie S.P.;  Altmann M.;  Gutierrez B.;  Kraemer M.U.G.;  Colizza V.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10227 (871-877). Date of Publication: 14 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has spread from China to 25 countries. Local cycles of transmission have already occurred in 12 countries after case importation. In Africa, Egypt has so far confirmed one case. The management and control of COVID-19 importations heavily rely on a country’s health capacity. Here we evaluate the preparedness and vulnerability of African countries against their risk of importation of COVID-19. Methods: We used data on the volume of air travel departing from airports in the infected provinces in China and directed to Africa to estimate the risk of importation per country. We determined the country’s capacity to detect and respond to cases with two indicators: preparedness, using the WHO International Health Regulations Monitoring and Evaluation Framework; and vulnerability, using the Infectious Disease Vulnerability Index. Countries were clustered according to the Chinese regions contributing most to their risk. Findings: Countries with the highest importation risk (ie, Egypt, Algeria, and South Africa) have moderate to high capacity to respond to outbreaks. Countries at moderate risk (ie, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Angola, Tanzania, Ghana, and Kenya) have variable capacity and high vulnerability. We identified three clusters of countries that share the same exposure to the risk originating from the provinces of Guangdong, Fujian, and the city of Beijing, respectively. Interpretation: Many countries in Africa are stepping up their preparedness to detect and cope with COVID-19 importations. Resources, intensified surveillance, and capacity building should be urgently prioritised in countries with moderate risk that might be ill-prepared to detect imported cases and to limit onward transmission. Funding: EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Horizon 2020, Agence Nationale de la Recherche.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30411-6

RECORD 66
TITLE
  Practical recommendations for critical care and anesthesiology teams caring for novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) patients
AUTHOR NAMES
  Wax R.S.;  Christian M.D.
SOURCE
  Canadian Journal of Anesthesia (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  A global health emergency has been declared by the World Health Organization as the 2019-nCoV outbreak spreads across the world, with confirmed patients in Canada. Patients infected with 2019-nCoV are at risk for developing respiratory failure and requiring admission to critical care units. While providing optimal treatment for these patients, careful execution of infection control measures is necessary to prevent nosocomial transmission to other patients and to healthcare workers providing care. Although the exact mechanisms of transmission are currently unclear, human-to-human transmission can occur, and the risk of airborne spread during aerosol-generating medical procedures remains a concern in specific circumstances. This paper summarizes important considerations regarding patient screening, environmental controls, personal protective equipment, resuscitation measures (including intubation), and critical care unit operations planning as we prepare for the possibility of new imported cases or local outbreaks of 2019-nCoV. Although understanding of the 2019-nCoV virus is evolving, lessons learned from prior infectious disease challenges such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome will hopefully improve our state of readiness regardless of the number of cases we eventually manage in Canada.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12630-020-01591-x

RECORD 67
TITLE
  Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) early-stage importation risk to Europe, January 2020
AUTHOR NAMES
  Pullano G.;  Pinotti F.;  Valdano E.;  Boëlle P.-Y.;  Poletto C.;  Colizza V.
SOURCE
  Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin (2020) 25:4. Date of Publication: 1 Jan 2020
ABSTRACT
  As at 27 January 2020, 42 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) cases were confirmed outside China. We estimate the risk of case importation to Europe from affected areas in China via air travel. We consider travel restrictions in place, three reported cases in France, one in Germany. Estimated risk in Europe remains high. The United Kingdom, Germany and France are at highest risk. Importation from Beijing and Shanghai would lead to higher and widespread risk for Europe.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.4.2000057