Economic and Social Impact

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List of Articles

RECORD 1
TITLE
  Looming threat of COVID-19 infection in Africa: act collectively, and fast
AUTHOR NAMES
  Nkengasong J.N.;  Mankoula W.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10227 (841-842). Date of Publication: 14 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30464-5

RECORD 2
TITLE
  COVID-19 battle during the toughest sanctions against Iran
AUTHOR NAMES
  Takian A.;  Raoofi A.;  Kazempour-Ardebili S.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10229 (1035-1036). Date of Publication: 28 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30668-1

RECORD 3
TITLE
  Covid-19: Trump declares intention to “re-open economy” within weeks against experts’ advice
AUTHOR NAMES
  Dyer O.
SOURCE
  BMJ (Clinical research ed.) (2020) 368 (m1217). Date of Publication: 25 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1217

RECORD 4
TITLE
  Expanded Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells (UC-MSCs) as a Therapeutic Strategy in Managing Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients: The Case for Compassionate Use
AUTHOR NAMES
  Atluri S.;  Manchikanti L.;  Hirsch J.A.
SOURCE
  Pain physician (2020) 23:2 (E71-E83). Date of Publication: 1 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  COVID-19 has affected the United States leading to a national emergency with health care and economic impact, propelling the country into a recession with disrupted lifestyles not seen in recent history. COVID-19 is a serious illness leading to multiple deaths in various countries including the United States. Several million Americans satisfy the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for being high risk. Unfortunately, the available supply of medical beds and equipment for mechanical ventilation are much less than is projected to be needed. The World Health Organization (WHO) and multiple agencies led by the CDC in the United States have attempted to organize intensive outbreak investigation programs utilizing appropriate preventive measures, evaluation, and treatment. The clinical spectrum of COVID-19 varies from asymptomatic forms to conditions encompassing multiorgan and systemic manifestations in terms of septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) syndromes. The presently approved treatments are supportive but not curative for the disease. There are multiple treatments being studied. These include vaccines, medications Remdesivir and hydroxychloroquine and potentially combination therapy. Finally, expanded umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells or (UC-MSCs) may have a role and are being studied. The cure of COVID-19 is essentially dependent on the patients’ own immune system. When the immune system is over activated in an attempt to kill the virus, this can lead to the production of a large number of inflammatory factors, resulting in severe cytokine storm. The cytokine storm may induce organ damage followed by the edema, dysfunction of air exchange, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute cardiac injury, and secondary infection, which may lead to death. Thus, at this point, the avoidance of the cytokine storm may be the key for the treatment of HCOV-19 infected patients.In China, where there was limited availability of effective modalities to manage COVID-19 several patients were treated with expanded UC-MSCs. Additionally, the Italian College of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care have reported guidelines to treat coronavirus patients with stem cells in the hope of decreasing the number of patients going to the ICU, and, also relatively quickly getting them out of ICU. In this manuscript, we describe the urgent need for various solutions, pathogenesis of coronavirus and the clinical evidence for treatment of COVID-19 with stem cells. The limited but emerging evidence regarding UC MSC in managing COVID-19 suggests that it might be considered for compassionate use in critically ill patients to reduce morbidity and mortality in the United States. The administration and Coronavirus Task Force might wish to approach the potential of expanded UC-MSCs as an evolutionary therapeutic strategy in managing COVID-19 illness with a 3-pronged approach: If proven safe and effective on a specific and limited basis…1. Minimize regulatory burden by all agencies so that critically ill COVID-19 patients will have access regardless of their financial circumstance.2. Institute appropriate safeguards to avoid negative consequences from unscrupulous actors.3. With proper informed consent from patients or proxy when necessary, and subject to accumulation of data in that cohort, allow the procedure to be initiated in critically ill patients who are not responding to conventional therapies.KEY WORDS: Coronavirus, COVID-19, cytokine storm, multiorgan failure, expanded umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells.

RECORD 5
TITLE
  Covid-19 exposes weaknesses in European response to outbreaks
AUTHOR NAMES
  Anderson M.;  McKee M.;  Mossialos E.
SOURCE
  The BMJ (2020) 368 Article Number: m1075. Date of Publication: 18 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1075

RECORD 6
TITLE
  How Is the World Responding to the 2019 Coronavirus Disease Compared with the 2014 West African Ebola Epidemic? The Importance of China as a Player in the Global Economy
AUTHOR NAMES
  Maffioli E.M.
SOURCE
  The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene (2020). Date of Publication: 11 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  This article describes similarities and differences in the response of governments and the international community to the current 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the 2014 West African Ebola epidemic. It expresses the opinion that the speed and scale of the response to the 2019 COVID-19 are affected by the important role that China plays in the global economy. By contrast, insufficient and less timely action was initially undertaken in West African countries during the 2014 Ebola epidemic. It concludes by stating why preparedness for and response to all disease outbreaks, also in countries of lower economic importance, should become a priority in the global health agenda.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.20-0135

RECORD 7
TITLE
  COVID-19 outbreak: An overview on dentistry
AUTHOR NAMES
  Spagnuolo G.;  De Vito D.;  Rengo S.;  Tatullo M.
SOURCE
  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020) 17:6 Article Number: 2094. Date of Publication: 2 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062094

RECORD 8
TITLE
  Strategies shift as coronavirus pandemic looms: The virus seems unstoppable, but mitigating its speed and impact is possible
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cohen J.;  Kupferschmidt K.
SOURCE
  Science (2020) 367:6481 (962-963). Date of Publication: 28 Feb 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.367.6481.962

RECORD 9
TITLE
  COVID-19 and Economy
AUTHOR NAMES
  Gupta M.;  Abdelmaksoud A.;  Jafferany M.;  Lotti T.;  Sadoughifar R.;  Goldust M.
SOURCE
  Dermatologic therapy (2020) (e13329). Date of Publication: 26 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13329

RECORD 10
TITLE
  The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)—An emerging global health threat
AUTHOR NAMES
  Arshad Ali S.;  Baloch M.;  Ahmed N.;  Arshad Ali A.;  Iqbal A.
SOURCE
  Journal of Infection and Public Health (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) causing novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia (NCIP), has affected the lives of 71,429 people globally. Originating in China, the disease has a rapid progression to other countries. Research suggests remarkable genomic resemblance of 2019-nCoV with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) which has a history of a pandemic in 2002. With evidence of nosocomial spread, a number of diligent measures are being employed to constrain its propagation. Hence, the Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) has been established by the World Health Organization (WHO) with strategic objectives for public health to curtail its impact on global health and economy.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2020.02.033

RECORD 11
TITLE
  The psychological impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on college students in China
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cao W.;  Fang Z.;  Hou G.;  Han M.;  Xu X.;  Dong J.;  Zheng J.
SOURCE
  Psychiatry Research (2020) 287 Article Number: 112934. Date of Publication: 1 May 2020
ABSTRACT
  A COVID-19 epidemic has been spreading in China and other parts of the world since December 2019. The epidemic has brought not only the risk of death from infection but also unbearable psychological pressure. We sampled college students from Changzhi medical college by using cluster sampling. They responded to a questionnaire packet that included the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and those inquiring the participants’ basic information. We received 7,143 responses. Results indicated that 0.9% of the respondents were experiencing severe anxiety, 2.7% moderate anxiety, and 21.3% mild anxiety. Moreover, living in urban areas (OR = 0.810, 95% CI = 0.709 – 0.925), family income stability (OR = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.645 – 0.817) and living with parents (OR = 0.752, 95% CI = 0.596 – 0.950) were protective factors against anxiety. Moreover, having relatives or acquaintances infected with COVID-19 was a risk factor for increasing the anxiety of college students (OR = 3.007, 95% CI = 2.377 – 3.804). Results of correlation analysis indicated that economic effects, and effects on daily life, as well as delays in academic activities, were positively associated with anxiety symptoms (P <.001). However, social support was negatively correlated with the level of anxiety (P <.001). It is suggested that the mental health of college students should be monitored during epidemics.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112934

RECORD 12
TITLE
  Identification of COVID-19 Can be Quicker through Artificial Intelligence framework using a Mobile Phone-Based Survey in the Populations when Cities/Towns Are under Quarantine
AUTHOR NAMES
  Rao A.S.R.S.;  Vazquez J.A.
SOURCE
  Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology (2020). Date of Publication: 2020
ABSTRACT
  We are proposing to use machine learning algorithms to be able to improve possible case identifications of COVID-19 more quicker when we use a mobile phone-based web survey. This will also reduce the spread in the susceptible populations.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.61

RECORD 13
TITLE
  Budgeting for covid-19: Changing the narrative and narrating the change
AUTHOR NAMES
  Cowper A.
SOURCE
  The BMJ (2020) 368 Article Number: m1053. Date of Publication: 13 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1053

RECORD 14
TITLE
  Mass masking in the COVID-19 epidemic: people need guidance
AUTHOR NAMES
  Leung C.C.;  Lam T.H.;  Cheng K.K.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10228 (945). Date of Publication: 21 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30520-1

RECORD 15
TITLE
  Postacute Care Preparedness for COVID-19: Thinking Ahead
AUTHOR NAMES
  Grabowski D.C.;  Joynt Maddox K.E.
SOURCE
  JAMA – Journal of the American Medical Association (2020) Article Number: 4686. Date of Publication: 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.4686

RECORD 16
TITLE
  Action at a Distance: Geriatric Research during a Pandemic
AUTHOR NAMES
  Nicol G.E.;  Piccirillo J.F.;  Mulsant B.H.;  Lenze E.J.
SOURCE
  Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2020). Date of Publication: 24 Mar 2020
ABSTRACT
  BACKGROUND: “Action at a distance” may be the new norm for clinical researchers in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which may require social distancing for the next 18 months. We must minimize face-to-face contact with vulnerable populations. But we must also persist, adapt, and help our older patients and study participants during the pandemic. METHODS: Clinical researchers have an obligation to help, and we can. Recommendations for clinical researchers working with older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed. RESULTS: Implement technology now: Minimize face-to-face contact with participants by utilizing digital tools, such as shifting to electronic informed consent and digital HIPAA-compliant tools like emailed surveys or telehealth assessments. Assess the psychological and social impact of COVID-19: How are participants coping? What health or social behaviors have changed? How are they keeping up with current events? What are they doing to stay connected to their families, friends, and communities? Are their health care needs being met? Current studies should be adapted immediately to these ends. Mobilize research platforms for patient needs: Leverage our relationships with participants and rapidly deploy novel clinical engagement techniques such as digital tools to intervene remotely to reduce the negative effects of social isolation on our participants. Equip research staff with tangible resources, and provide timely population-specific health information to support patients and healthcare providers. CONCLUSIONS: We have an opportunity to make an impact on our older adult patients now, as this pandemic continues to unfold. Above all, clinical researchers need to continue working – to help as many people as possible through the crisis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16443

RECORD 17
TITLE
  COVID-19: the medium is the message
AUTHOR NAMES
  Garrett L.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10228 (942-943). Date of Publication: 21 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30600-0

RECORD 18
TITLE
  How will country-based mitigation measures influence the course of the COVID-19 epidemic?
AUTHOR NAMES
  Anderson R.M.;  Heesterbeek H.;  Klinkenberg D.;  Hollingsworth T.D.
SOURCE
  The Lancet (2020) 395:10228 (931-934). Date of Publication: 21 Mar 2020
FULL TEXT LINK
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30567-5